5 doctors weighed in:

Why don't men want to go to doctors? My husband has cervical spondylosis, and I feel I have to drag him in to be seen. What will happen to him without treatment?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kevin Teal
Neurosurgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: Life may be ok

Cervical spondylosis is a natural aging of the spine.
It may be associated with neck pain and disc bulges/canal narrowing that cause arm numbness/tingling and weakness. Usually people who need treatment won't have to be drug to the doctor when symptoms get bad. Let your husband figure out when his pain is bad enough to warrant a doctor visit. He can try physical therapy or injections w/o surgery.

In brief: Life may be ok

Cervical spondylosis is a natural aging of the spine.
It may be associated with neck pain and disc bulges/canal narrowing that cause arm numbness/tingling and weakness. Usually people who need treatment won't have to be drug to the doctor when symptoms get bad. Let your husband figure out when his pain is bad enough to warrant a doctor visit. He can try physical therapy or injections w/o surgery.
Dr. Kevin Teal
Dr. Kevin Teal
Thank
Dr. Marcel Hungs
Neurology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Tough

I notice that men often avoid healthcare providers.
There is a science around gender differences in physiology and psychology. Cervical spondylosis can hurt and ultimately damage nerve roots. In rare situation, a spinal cord damage is seen. An MRI of the spine can help.

In brief: Tough

I notice that men often avoid healthcare providers.
There is a science around gender differences in physiology and psychology. Cervical spondylosis can hurt and ultimately damage nerve roots. In rare situation, a spinal cord damage is seen. An MRI of the spine can help.
Dr. Marcel Hungs
Dr. Marcel Hungs
Thank
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