6 doctors weighed in:

What happens to my child as a result of bacterial tracheitis?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Sidman
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery - Pediatric
4 doctors agree

In brief: Long term nothing

Bacterial tracheitis can cause airway obstruction from infected crusts building up in the trachea.
It is treated with bronchoscopy, antibiotics, steroids, etc. If there is no need for long term intubation, then there should be no problems with long term issues. Occasionally there will be permanent scarring of the trachea that can be fixed if necessary.

In brief: Long term nothing

Bacterial tracheitis can cause airway obstruction from infected crusts building up in the trachea.
It is treated with bronchoscopy, antibiotics, steroids, etc. If there is no need for long term intubation, then there should be no problems with long term issues. Occasionally there will be permanent scarring of the trachea that can be fixed if necessary.
Dr. James Sidman
Dr. James Sidman
Thank
Dr. Martin Raff
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease

In brief: Hopefully get better

If acute bacterial tracheitis is treated rapidly and appropriately your child should recover. This often follows some injury to the trachea, and may occur postoperatively following intubation.
Sometimes individuals are predisposed to this by forms of immune deficiencies. Your pediatrician can discuss these effectively.

In brief: Hopefully get better

If acute bacterial tracheitis is treated rapidly and appropriately your child should recover. This often follows some injury to the trachea, and may occur postoperatively following intubation.
Sometimes individuals are predisposed to this by forms of immune deficiencies. Your pediatrician can discuss these effectively.
Dr. Martin Raff
Dr. Martin Raff
Thank
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