Does DMSO help plantar fasciitis?

Evidence says. No. According to doctors who study effective medicine and treatments, there is no good published study in peer reviewed journals that shows DMSO effectively treats plantar fasciitis. Although there are "experiences" with patients who have good results, these may be placebo-effects and not "evidence" based medicine.
No. If your plantar fasciitis gets better with DMSO, then it get better without it as well.
Short Answer--Yes. Plantar fasciitis is difficult to treat--but topical DMSO can be very helpful. Get good arch supports for your shoes, and avoid the activity that caused your plantar fasciitis in the first place (prolonged standing, walking on hard surfaces, etc). Apply DMSO several times each day, use white socks (dmso is a solvent, and you may absorb colored dyes). Don't expect symptoms to resolve overnight.
See a podiatrist. Plantar fasciitis is inflammation of the plantar fascia. Most often it is caused by improper footwear or lack of footwear. Conservative care often works best. See your local podiatrist for the best options in diagnosis and treatment. Are you sure you have plantar fasciitis? Supportive shoes worn at all times often treats it effectively - avoid flip flops, slip on shoes, barefoot to start. No dmso!

Related Questions

How do I treat plantar fasciitis?

Plantar faciitis. Stretching and nsaids ( aleve, (naproxen) ibuprofen, etc ) are the treatments you can do at home.....If that does not resolve the issue... See a specialist..... You may not have plantar fasciitis... X-rays and sometimes a MRI are needed to rule out other heel pain causes. Read more...
Multiple ways. Treatment requires a combination of stretching, icing, physical therapy, anti-inflammatories, change in shoegear and custom made orthotics that are well made. Other more invasive options include shock wave therapy, cortisone injections, and surgery to release the tight plantar fascia. Read more...
few ways. Good supportive shoes or arch supports. If the fascia is "stressed" whether by a degenerative process or inflammation it needs to be supported while ambulating and have the strain taken off of it. Iceing the heel is helful. Stretching of your achilles tendon helps, antiinflammatories can be useful as well. Night splints often help to relieve morning pain or pain on the first few steps. Read more...
Combo treatment. . If you have plantar fasciitis, and hurt most with the first few steps in the morning, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Read more...
Protocol... I'd say 98% of my plantar fascitis patients respond to non-surgical treatments... Rest, supportive insoles, rx orthotics, otc anti-inflammatories (like aleve), prescription nsaid's, steroid injections, prp injections, physical therapy, etc... If all else fails... Surgery. Read more...

How can you treat plantar fasciitis?

Start with ice. Achilles' tendon stretches, rolling a frozen water bottle under your arch while sitting, wearing arch supports, if pain persists see a podiatrist. Read more...
Stretching inserts. Stretching mid arch with golf ball start gently and use more pressure avoid ball and heel of foot. Otc Motrin if no his of cardiovascular heart problems liver or stomach problems, get otc arch supports. If still symptomatic see podiatrist. Read more...
Combo treatment. . If you have plantar fasciitis, and hurt most with the first few steps in the morning, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections. Read more...

What helps heal plantar fasciitis faster?

Lots of things. Most cases of plantar fasciiitis will get better with time. Things that help include comfortable shoes; heel cups or orthotic devices, activity modification, ice, night splints, and probably most importantly, a plantar fasciitis stretching program. Clearly, if the pain has lasted more than a few weeks, seeing an orthopaedic foot and ankle specialist or a podiatrists is recommended. Read more...
Combined treatment. The vast majority of plantar fasciitis can be resolved with non surgical management including heel cord stretching, deep tissue mobilization, over the counter arch supports, anti inflammatories, and night splints. While each of these treatments in of themself may be effective, a combined approach is more likely to heal it "faster". Read more...
Therapy. Plantar fasciitis can get better or worse with standard treatment. I disagree with the standard therapy. My Rx: After the acute phase (about 1-2 weeks), ice and braces are counterproductive. To heal naturally, you have to increase blood flow to feet (nightly hot soaks of feet), keep feet warm in bed with socks, and daily activation of the skin reflexes to improve blood flow and diminish pain. Read more...

Is it difficult to cure plantar fasciitis?

Yes. Plantar fasciitis can be difficult to get rid of. There are many different treatments and it often depends on patient compliance to treatment plan. Read more...
Sometimes. Plantar fasciitis is usually due to a combination of mechanical stress on the plantar fascia and inflammation. Addressing both of these usually take care of the problem 90-95% of the time. You need to try an anti inflammatory along with a good arch support and stretching if this does not help follow up with your podiatrist. Read more...
It can be. The good news is approx 90% of patients get better without surgery or other invasive treatment. On the conservative side, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections. Read more...
Yes. Plantar fasciitis is a difficult condition to cure. This relates to the poor blood supply received by this soft tissue band which supports the arch. Poor blood flow means less healing cells are delivered to the area. Also, it can be a difficult area to rest given the normal weight bearing on the foot with every day activities. It is not uncommon to have symptoms for over 1 year. Read more...

What are some exercises for plantar fasciitis?

See below. From a sitting position and knees shoulder apart, raise your toes towards the front of your leg while keeping your heels on the ground. From same position raise up on your toes until you feel stretch in the plantar fascia and achilles tendon. Read more...
Stretching such as. Standing on your toes on a step and then dropping heels below level of toes is great as mentioned in another answer. Something else I have found has helped is take a golf ball or a water bottle (empty a little water out first) and freeze them. Sit in a chair and place either one under your foot and massage foot back and forth on the frozen object. Many people get great relief with this. Read more...
Sometimes ok, but... Reasonable exercise is always good for you. But there is no specific one for treating plantar fasciitis, although many are recommended. If you want to heal, you have to convince your body to increase circulation and relieve the pain. Stretching exercise is not really good since the PF needs to be tight for your foot to keep normal shape. Ice is for restricting blood flow and is really bad. Read more...
Good idea ... Plantar Fasciitis will usually get better with persistence in conservative management, ie; rest, foot supports, NSAIDs, and exercises. Have a look at ... http://patient.info/health/heel-and-foot-pain-plantar-fasciitis ... for some structured advice on exercises. Most of the exercises focus on stretching calf and achilles in addition to plantar fascia. Slow and steady ... Read more...

I have plantar fasciitis what is the best cure?

Conservative care. Stretching, physical therapy, injections, night splint, orthotics and oral medication. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Read more...

What is the best way to help plantar fasciitis?

SHOES. I'm not an expert but i found wearing clark wallabees with thick gummy rubber soles or wearing sketcher rocker shoes has relieved the problem for me. Cortisone shots gave very temporary relief. Read more...
Stretching... The initial therapy for plantar fasciits involves stretching. I would seek the attention of an orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon to get a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan. You can find one in your area at aofas.Org. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections. Read more...