With blood and lymph cancer what else should I be concerned about?

Infections, bleeding. Blood and lymph cancer and the treatment for the disease can downgrade the defenses of the body, especially for fighting infections. The disease and treatment also depress the bone marrow causing anemia, low platelets and bleeding etc.
What do you mean? What do you mean by blood and lymph cancer? Are you talking about lymphoma or leukemia? Please rephrase your question to give you a better answer.

Related Questions

Describe the features of a blood and lymph cancer.?

Symptoms. Common presenting symptoms of blood cancer (leukemia) and lymph cancer (lymphoma) are weight loss, impaired immunity with infections, abnormal bleeding, enlarging lymph glands, and anemia with attendant fatigue and weakness. There may be fevers and sweats. None of these symptoms are specific and laboratory testing must be done to rule out more benign conditions and to make an accurate diagnosis. Read more...
Many possible things. Leukemia (blood cancer) mainly affects bone marrow. This disrupts the production of normal blood cells leading to anemia, infections, and bleeding or bruising. Lymphoma (lymph node cancer) can cause growth of the lymph nodes so the symptoms depend on the location of these nodes. Leukemia may involve lymph nodes too and both cancers can affect the spleen and liver, so abdominal symptoms may occur. Read more...

How do I tell kids grandma has blood and lymph cancer? What do they need to know?

It depends. Dependis on which type of blood cancer she has the prognosis and treatment (and side effects) would be very different. Certain lymphoma's can have a very slow course and in an older person not require any treatment and may only be worth mentioning as a part of grandmothers health. If she has a more aggressive lymphoma you may want to prepare them for chemo effects (hair loss, fatigue, etc). Read more...
It is not infectious. The kids need to be reassured that they will not catch the disease from grandma. Other than that you may communicate the diagnosis according to the level of their understanding. It is a cancer, but you may wish to avoid that term and state that she has a disorder of the lymph glands. Read more...
I'm not sure what. "blood and lymph" cancer means, chronic lymphocytic leukemia? A lot depends on your kids age, and how close they are with grandma, but this is delicate in respecting her privacy, and your desire to educate or prepare your kids, for what, a discussion of mortality and death and dying or valiant battles with cancer? A mine field without full knowledge and skill, and it varies with prognosis. Read more...

Just heard a close neighbor has blood and lymph cancer. How do we explain this condition to the kids?

Limit exposures. Cancer of the blood and lymph glands (leukemia and lymphoma) may be caused by a number of different molecular changes in the dna. Although there may not be just one "cause", we know that some contributing factors include family history of similar cancers, exposures to certain viruses, chemicals, and high radiation doses. Family should not be overly concerned and many treatments are effective. Read more...
Not catchey. Cancer of the blood and lymph nodes is a sporadic cancer, though it may have viral etiology in some cases. However, it is not transmissible from one person to an other. You should treat your neighbor with the same compassion as you would treat any other person with a serious illness. Read more...
I'm not sure what. "blood and lymph" cancer means, chronic lymphocytic leukemia? A lot depends on your kids age, and how close they are to the neighbor, but this is delicate in respecting your neighbors right to privacy, and your desire to educate or prepare your kids, for what, a discussion of mortality and death and dying or valiant battles with cancer? A mine field without full knowledge and skill. Read more...

They say an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. What about blood and lymph cancer?

No clear data. Good question, however we don't know the impact of these things on this form of cancer. There are a few international consortiums following family cohorts with blood cancers to detect what makes some of the family members develop the disease and others not- this work may identify the environmental triggers involved. Read more...
None that we know of. For most people, there is not a lot that can be done to prevent "liquid cancers" - such as lymphoma and leukemia. We don't know of any dietary changes, for example, that reduce the risk of these cancers. It makes sense, though, to follow a healthy diet, exercise, and maintain a normal bmi to reduce risks of cancer in general. Read more...
No easy way. The causes of blood and lymph cancer are generally not known, and in the cases the cause is known, e.g. Ebv infection, there is no vaccine against this virus and it is not practical to avoid exposure to this virus. Some chemicals, e.g., benzene are associated with leukemia and avoidance of toxic chemicals is about the only prevention i can suggest. Read more...
Not preventable. In spite of what anyone may tell you, leukemia / lymphoma are not preventable diseases. Down's trisomy 21, being an ataxia-telangiectasia carrier, having taking certain chemotherapeutic agents, or having radiation exposure increase your risk. The cliche about prevention applies to infectious, lifestyle, and emotional disease. Read more...