7 doctors weighed in:

Bicep/wrist pain, tingling elbow/fingers what causes this? Electrolytes ok, neck MRI neg, xray of arm neg. Dont know what else to do.

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Barry Callahan
Surgery - Hand Surgery
4 doctors agree

In brief: EMG/NCV

I would definitely recommend an emg/ncv.
Your symptoms definitely sound neurogenic and there are a number of peripheral nerve compression syndromes that occur in the upper extremity. Hope this helps:).

In brief: EMG/NCV

I would definitely recommend an emg/ncv.
Your symptoms definitely sound neurogenic and there are a number of peripheral nerve compression syndromes that occur in the upper extremity. Hope this helps:).
Dr. Barry Callahan
Dr. Barry Callahan
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Dr. Laurence Badgley
General Practice
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Look to shoulder

Pain fr. Biceps (anterior shoulder) to wrist implicates cervical spine/shoulder. With nl MRI cervical spinal root impingement doubtful.
Carpal & cubital (elbow) tunnel nerve impingements don't arouse shoulder pain. Elbow/hand parasthesias (tingling) common with brachial plexus neural impingement by mass (imaging ruled out) or thoracic outlet syndrome. See physiatrist or osteopath to diagnose.

In brief: Look to shoulder

Pain fr. Biceps (anterior shoulder) to wrist implicates cervical spine/shoulder. With nl MRI cervical spinal root impingement doubtful.
Carpal & cubital (elbow) tunnel nerve impingements don't arouse shoulder pain. Elbow/hand parasthesias (tingling) common with brachial plexus neural impingement by mass (imaging ruled out) or thoracic outlet syndrome. See physiatrist or osteopath to diagnose.
Dr. Laurence Badgley
Dr. Laurence Badgley
Thank
2 comments
Dr. John Michalski
Could be DO or MD in the fields of orthopedics, neurology, or physiatry. There is significant overlap on this one.
Dr. Laurence Badgley
Unfortunately, the test that Neurologist seem to rely on to "diagnose" the type of disorder being discussed here are the electrodiagnostic studies of EMG and NCT.  I have read numerous consultation reports wherein Neurologists have relied on these reports to opine what the disorder "is not".  These studies are effective at discerning what tissue disorder is occurring, but ineffective at determining what it is not.  As I understand it, these studies can discover neural tracts wherein nerves cell death has occurred.  The problem is that a good portion of painful soft tissue injuries contain biomechanical processes in which neural tracts are intermittently impinged but not injured to the point of cell death.  Sciatica is one example of this dynamic.  Therefore, opinions that chronic pain symptoms are factitious or exaggerated based on negative Electrodiagnostic studies are irrelevant.  I have observed the furtherance of several diagnostic work-ups impeded by Neurologists' opinions that the patients' pain complaints were factitious based on negative electrodiagnostic studies.  In my opinion. 
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