How does having breast carcinoma change things?

Life-changer. I think that every person who is diagnosed with any type of cancer goes thru that initial "shock" which can be overwhelming. However, most (breast) cancers can be readily treated, and many cured. The best thing to do is to aggressively seek out medical info and try to "take control" of the disease, rather than the other way around. In time, one will hopefully get back to their normal lives.
Depends. It depends on the stage of the disease. Early diagnosis may mean a "lumpectomy" and no further treatment, just md followup visits. Late diagnosis affects the quality and length of life including surgery, radiation or chemotherapy treatments.

Related Questions

What are the main causes of breast cancer? Does fibrocytic changes are prone to breast cancer?

Very common cancer. Breast cancer is common. Most risk factors only indicate danger, but are not causes. Early detection is key (self exams monthly and mammograms). Several gene mutations increase risk. Testing is indicated if a number of relatives have breast, ovarian or pancreas cancer. Fibro-cystic disease is a benign group of conditions without cancer risk but fibrous density can make cancer detection harder. Read more...
See NCI Cancer Risk. On the web for a fairly full list of risks. Fibrocystic changes of the breast are normal for women in the us, and are not related to cancer risk. Read more...

Should I make any changes in my diet or physical exercise to reduce the risks of breast cancer?

Yes. Nutrition plays an important roll in cancer risk. Try this tool to learn more: http://www.Aicr.Org/site/pageserver?Pagename=reduce_diet_quiz. Read more...
Yes. If you have a normal body weight, a normal healthy life style is ok. (few mins of exercise each day and avoid diet with high fat content). Read more...
Yes. Physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer. You should do at least 30 minutes of vigorous activity 3 or more times a week. A high fat diet is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, so cut down on fried or fatty foods. Read more...
Yes. Several studies have shown being overweight adversely affects survival for postmenopausal women with breast cancer. Similarly, studies have shown that losing weight and exercising regularly increases survival in breast cancer patients. Read more...
Yes. Thnk healthy. If you r under forty, get 7-8 hours of slee; eat fresh vegetables and fruits, include all food typesinclude poly/monosaturated fats importan, carbohydrates, two eggs per week, meats about 2-3 per week, fish at least twice per week; drink 6-8 glasses water equivalent daily; maintain BMI normal. Active lifestyle, equivalent of 45 mintues aerobic 4 times wk. Stairs. Walkweightwater. Read more...
Gotta do it! Veggies - whole foods! just move it, whatever it takes. 6 days a week. Start slow. Read more...
Breast ca & weight. Fat (adipose) tissue is a source of estrogen production. This is the probable reason why overweight and obese women are at increased risk for breast cancer. Breast cancers that are hormonally responsive (receptor positive) may also progress more rapidly in those with excess adipose tissue. If yor body mass is high due to muscle, not fat - then there is probably no increased risks wrt br ca. Read more...

They found a 6cm mass in my breast what is the changes of it being breast cancer?

High. Most benign breast masses are smaller. Nothing's certain until biopsy. Be brave. Ask to have more than one pathologist look at the biopsy. Best wishes. Read more...
Depends. It depends on the characteristics of the mass, which should be determined by imaging and a physician. You absolutely need a core needle biopsy followed by excision. Don't be afraid, be proactive and get the answer. Read more...

29yo. Pat grndmthr diagnosis Breast [email protected] Ovarian [email protected] 34& took [email protected] Inherent odds? +Ive virtually zero chest, size <34A-change my odds?

Hereditary CA. With grandma having both cancers at a young age, and both ca being the ones linked to a gene you should talk to your doctor about testing and what you would do differently if positive. Also see if you can get more family history data. That would help a lot. Size of your breasts won't really matter. Gather info, calculate risks, and stay on top of screening. Read more...

How have the treatments for breast cancer changed from the past 20 years?

Alot! Chemo: molecular staging leading to more precise targeted therapy; new drugs such as Herceptin (trastuzumab) and aromatase inhibitors. Surgery: increased breast conserving rx, sentinel ln biopsy, oncoplastic surgery, nipple-sparing mastectomy. Radiation therapy: partial breast irradiation (brachytherapy, intraoperative radiation therapy). Prevention: brca testing....Just to a name a few. Read more...
By the 1990's... Breast conservation was proven to be equivalent to mastectomy, and that evidence holds strongly today. Use of sentinel node, and now limiting node dissetion is new. Knowledge of brca, her-2-neu, trastuzumab (herceptin) are since then. Some women now opt for bilateral mastectomy (+/- reconstruction) despite no change in mortality has currency. Chemo with taxanes and neoadjuvant approaches newer. Read more...

Can you tell me how has the treatment of breast cancer changed over the years?

Many things . Over the last few decades many things have changed: Taxanes as part of the chemo plan is established for lymph node-positive disease. Herceptin was approved for Her2+ breast cancer. Pertuzumab was approved for Her2+ breast cancer when given before surgery. Lumpectomy and radiation are alternative to mastectomy in many patients. Radiation is more focused, allowing less toxicity. . Read more...