12 doctors weighed in:
I know this dude who has chicken pox. What is that?
12 doctors weighed in

Dr. Keira Barr
Dermatology
9 doctors agree
In brief: A viral infection
Chicken pox also known as varicella, is the primary infection caused by the varicella zoster virus.
It causes a widespread rash that can have blisters/pustules and then the lesions scab up. It can be spread by direct contact with the rash as well as the respiratory route. It resolves on its own within a few weeks. Immunizations are available to prevent or minimize varicella infection.

In brief: A viral infection
Chicken pox also known as varicella, is the primary infection caused by the varicella zoster virus.
It causes a widespread rash that can have blisters/pustules and then the lesions scab up. It can be spread by direct contact with the rash as well as the respiratory route. It resolves on its own within a few weeks. Immunizations are available to prevent or minimize varicella infection.
Dr. Keira Barr
Dr. Keira Barr
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1 comment
Dr. Susan Lurie
Chicken pox or Varicella may be dangerous, especially to pregnant women and very young children. Immunization for the chicken pox starts at 1 year of age and is given again as a booster dose between age 4 and 6. Those immunized with the vaccine are much less likely to get the severe chicken pox infection that non-immunized people would get. Talk to your doctor if you have not been immunized.
Dr. Cindy Juster
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree
In brief: Chickenpox-no fun!
Chicken pox is varicella-zoster virus infection.
Before the chicken pox vaccine became available in the US in 1995, almost everyone had this infection at some point in childhood. This virus causes fever and a blistery rash, and can also cause pneumonia and brain infection! That's why the vaccine is so important -- make sure you've had both doses.

In brief: Chickenpox-no fun!
Chicken pox is varicella-zoster virus infection.
Before the chicken pox vaccine became available in the US in 1995, almost everyone had this infection at some point in childhood. This virus causes fever and a blistery rash, and can also cause pneumonia and brain infection! That's why the vaccine is so important -- make sure you've had both doses.
Dr. Cindy Juster
Dr. Cindy Juster
Thank
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