11 doctors weighed in:
I don't believe in exposing children to unnecessary treatment. Do I really need to treat circumscribed scleroderma?
11 doctors weighed in

Dr. Morris Westfried
Dermatology
7 doctors agree
In brief: No
Treatment is not essential however treatment will cause area to possible resolve quicker and decrease scarring and possible color change.
Topical medications are only partially effective but do not have side effects. Oral medications effect is variable.

In brief: No
Treatment is not essential however treatment will cause area to possible resolve quicker and decrease scarring and possible color change.
Topical medications are only partially effective but do not have side effects. Oral medications effect is variable.
Dr. Morris Westfried
Dr. Morris Westfried
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Dr. Pierre Moeser
Internal Medicine - Rheumatology
4 doctors agree
In brief: Optional
Circumscribed scleroderma can leave deep scars so i would not hesitate to treat if the lesions are on the face.
On the other hand, the treatments are not always successful and the disease does not involve internal organs. All treatments have at least some risks.

In brief: Optional
Circumscribed scleroderma can leave deep scars so i would not hesitate to treat if the lesions are on the face.
On the other hand, the treatments are not always successful and the disease does not involve internal organs. All treatments have at least some risks.
Dr. Pierre Moeser
Dr. Pierre Moeser
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Dr. Richard Feinstein
Dermatology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Thick skin
Scleroderma is an autoimmune disorder, affecting mostly females, that causes thick, hidebound, areas of skin.
It can be in small areas. Sometimes caused morphea, or systemic, which may include large areas and thickening of the internal organs like the esophagus or lungs. It is difficult to treat, and if there is only one small area, you can elect to not treat it, hoping it will go away by itself.

In brief: Thick skin
Scleroderma is an autoimmune disorder, affecting mostly females, that causes thick, hidebound, areas of skin.
It can be in small areas. Sometimes caused morphea, or systemic, which may include large areas and thickening of the internal organs like the esophagus or lungs. It is difficult to treat, and if there is only one small area, you can elect to not treat it, hoping it will go away by itself.
Dr. Richard Feinstein
Dr. Richard Feinstein
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