I know colorectal cancer has consequences. What are they?

Colorectal cancer. Consequences include need for surgery and other forms of treatment such as chemotherapy radiation. People may live for along time if disease caught early.
Early detection. If caught early, colon cancer can be removed and patients do well. If left unchecked colon cancer can spread to the liver and lungs and can cause gastrointestinal bleeding and obstruction.

Related Questions

I have severe neuropathy pain as a result of radiation & chemo for colorectal cancer Stage IIIB. Taking Neurontin. Tried Lyrica (pregabalin). Nothing is helping.

See pain management. specialist. Neuropathic pain is one of the most challenging and complex pain syndromes. You should see specifically a pain management specialist to manage your pain. Take care. Read more...
Complex. Proper tx. for has to be multi-faceted. Other medications, such as duloxetine and venlafaxine , can be tried, as well as certain anti-convulsants. Bio-feedback, yoga and other exercise , acupuncture, and therapeutic massage might help. You should see a neurologist or pain mgmt . specialist with experience in this type of pain. Though not ideal, sometimes opiods for certain pts. is an option. Read more...
FURTHER COMMENTS. Your nerve pain can be controlled, but you would do well to try these approaches: Lyrica, if tolerated, can work at high dosing, >400 mg daily in thrice daily regimen. Cymbalta, and Savella (milnacipran) might work, but using Gralise or Horizant may make tolerance of gabapentin better. The opioid Nucynta is approved for neuropathy in diabetes. Local compounded pain cremes with Ketamine, might work. Read more...
Therapy techniques. While pain medication can be helpful, there are various techniques that can help manage pain. Meditation, hypnosis, energy tapping, and changing your perception of pain can help. There are therapists who specialize in pain management. Also consider techniques discussed in my books, "Energy Tapping" and "Energy Tapping for Trauma". Read more...

Colorectal cancer causes?

Heredity & diet. The cause is not known in most cases. In a small number the cause is clearly heredity, e.g., apc and hnpcc. In the garden variety colon cancer, a diet low in fiber and rich in fats may increase the risk of cancer. Read more...

I think I have colorectal cancer?

Reason? Unless you have a family history or other predisposing factor you are probably too young for colorectal cancer. If you recently noticed a change in bowel habits or blood in stool get a GI checkup. Read more...

What ages does colorectal cancer affect?

It varies. Colon cancer can strike from the 20s and beyond, but is much more common in people in their 50s to 70s hence the recommendations to not routinely do colonoscopies in people before the age of 50. Colon cancer that presents before 60 is often genetic whereas after 60 is more likely due to environmental factors like smoking and red meat. Read more...
Colorectal Cancer. 90% of colorectal cancers strike after age 50, unless the person has a hereditary form such as familial adenomatous polyposis, or certain chronic diseases such as ulcerative colitis. There has been an uptick in recent years in cases in young people, and screening is recommended in those with a positive family history beginning at age 45. A colon cancer screening test is easy to obtain at any time. Read more...

What sort of disease is colorectal cancer?

Large bowel cancer. Colon and rectum form the large intestine (large bowel). Cancer of the large intestine is generally called colorectal cancer. Specifically, cancer of the colon is colon cancer. Cancer of the rectum is rectal cancer. People over 50 should have screening colonoscopy or occult blood test. Treatment for stages 1, 2, and 3 are mainly surgery. Chemo is for stages 3 and 4, and some stage 2. Read more...
Cancer. Cancer within the colon. Colonoscopy can prevent this so be sure to get screened. Read more...

Can you tell me what is colorectal cancer?

CRC. It is cancer of the large intestine (which includes the colon and the rectum, the part labeled #5 in the illustration). It is the third most common cancer for both sexes and one of the few for which there is successful screening methods. Usually starts in a polyp and can be associated with several inherited traits. Read more...