Nurse just called to set up appointment for my son. How do I tell him he might have autism spectrum disorder and needs to see doctor?

Neurodevelopmental . Neuro-developmental problems like autism spectrum are just that developmental problems and should not be thought of as pathology. We have yet to understand enough about the pathology of the brain/mind to even have a specific test for these disorders. An extremely important part of intervention is psycho-educational counseling for both the parents and child.
Depends on age. What you tell a child depends on age &ability 2 understand. Most young autistic patients won't understand explanation- language is their problem. Older pdd pts sense they're different, but again the explanation depends mostly on the individual. This is something accomplished with doctor's help &guidance. You also seem to be getting ahead of yourself. Tell the child he will be visiting dr 2 play, .
Don't use diagnosis. Depending on his age, it might be better to not mention the diagnosis, but motivate him by telling him that you want to do some testing to determine if there are some ways (training, medication, counseling) that could help him be more successful in school, with friends, etc. (choosing areas of his life that he knows are out of balance and in which he would like relief). Better to avoid labeling.
State your concerns. Without knowing the age of your child and what specific behaviors you've noticed to make you concerned, it's hard to give detailed advice, but it's always appropriate and helpful to let doctors know in advance why you want your child to be seen. The doctor might change the length of visit or even suggest that you see someone else with more specific expertise.

Related Questions

Nurse just called to set up appointment for my daughter. How do I tell her she might have autism spectrum disorder and needs to see doctor?

Depends on her age. Generally, telling your daughter that she will see the doctor to find out how to help her be the best person she can be is enough. Depending on her age and symptoms, you can mention that the doctor can help to find out why these issues are occurring and see what to do to help. Read more...
Simple is better. If your child is like most at this juncture, she will not understand elaborate explanations so describing a simple concern is best. If her issues result in classroom problems, or the teachers have asked you to set up the visit, tell her so.A simple, we want to see if there are ways to help you in the classroom is true and specific.Adults anticipate long term worries kids aren't able to grasp. Read more...
Just like you said. You can just say what you said here to the nurse. You might want to do some research first about the behaviors or autism so when you meet with the doctor you can explain why you think this is the case. Your local doctor might not feel comfortable making this diagnosis, and may want your daughter to see somebody who specializes in making this diagnosis. Read more...

This there really an autism spectrum disorder epidemic, or are doctors just labeling people with that name?

No there is more. It is true that there is more recognition now than before, but you can't account for the increase just by more vigilant diagnosis. If you talk to older pediatricians and family doctors they will tell you they used to see maybe 2 or 3 kids with autism their whole time in training. Now it is estimated to be 1 out of 88 kids (1 out of 54 boys, and 1 out of 252 girls). Read more...
Autism. Is up 6000% in the last 20 years. It has increased from 1:150 to 1:60 (according to some statistics) and it affects boys 4:1 to girls. It is not the result of better diagnosing or improved reporting. It is a problem. Read more...
Complicated. The spectrum came about as a new umbrella that includes not only Autism, but Aspergers & Pervasive Developmental Delay Not Otherwise Specified.The PDDNOS label was the "everything else" label.This was helpful to the kids, whose therapies were often similar, & schools would now receive consistent funding for their care.They were there, just not included in early numbers.There is also an increase. Read more...

I would like to get tested for autism spectrum disorder - how do I find a local doctor?

Insurance company. Call your insurance company to ask for a psychologist who does ASD evaluation. Read more...
Depends on location. Assuming you're an adult, you may find it hard even in large urban areas to find an expert. Getting someone to give you that label is not nearly as important as finding someone who can clarify your concerns and help figure out how to ease the problems you're having. There is no cure for asd. Find a psychologist or psychiatrist with a good reputation and start there. Read more...

My son was assessed with an autism spectrum disorder by an aprn, what are the next steps?

Seek assessment. You are off to a good start. Seek confirmation from a developmental pediatrician, child psychiatrist and/or child psychologist. Read more...

Any suggestions, concerned grandparent have a 16 yo g-son weighing approx 365lbs, 6'1", (autism spectrum disorder, add, etc) does mixed martial arts w/wrestling m-w-f equalling 5 hours wkly, also plays soccer t-thu with warm up excerise plays game for app

Diet . Diet is essential when trying to loose weight. If he only eats in the evenings and on weekends he is starving himself in a sense. Think of it like this, the body constantly nedds fuel (in the form of food) the body uses this fuel throughout the day, especially if one is working out as much as your grandson. If your grandson is consistently skipping breakfast and lunch, his body will think it's starving, and in turn will hold on to all the food he intakes(night time meals.) the body is basically saving this food up in the form of fat stores because it does not know when it will get more fuel. Over time these fat stores build up and so does your grandson's weight, regardless of the intense work outs. The best way to tackle this problem is to have your grandson eat 6 healthy small to medium sized meals a day. This will help boost his metabolism and get those fat stores burning! in addition you may consult a nutritionist for a detailed diet plan an further explanation/insight. Good luck. Read more...
His Body Mass Index, If 16 yrs., 0 mos. With ht. 73"'& wt. 365 lbs., is 48.26, in the morbidly obese range. A bmi of 27.51 is 95th%ile for him. Kids with autism often self-limit their diets, & eat only carbohydrates & high-fat foods & no green vegetables. Rec: blood tests for metabolic syndrome, diabetes, & genetic disorders (comparative genomic hybridization), a sleep study for apnea & review of his medications. Read more...
Nutrient dense foods. Eat foods that are nutrient dense (like meat, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese, low starch vegatables and water) avoid foods that are not nutrient dense (like starches and sugars, including fruit) nutrient dense foods will increase your basal metabolic rate. On the other hand, starches and sugars impair thyroid metabolism via affects on your liver (which helps activate thyroid hormone). Read more...
What's really wrong? This is morbid obesity that will ruin the quality of his life, whatever he really has. You'll need to tell me what "autism / add" really are, but I am concerned that junior may have prader-willi or another syndromic cause of morbid overeating. There's no one-size-fits-all answer, but there's new work on specific rx for prader-willi hyperphagia; bariatric surgery might be a consideration. Read more...

Can you tell me if that autism spectrum disorder is a disease to be cured and done away with or a different way of?

Not cured. But recovery is possible. It matters greatly what the symptoms are and how the person learns to adapt. Watch the hbo movie "temple grandin" to see her story about how she learned to function in society. Many different treatments work for some people and not for others. Every patient with ASD is unique their treatment should be individualized. Read more...
No. ASD is a group of separate issues tied together by the need for specialized /individual treatments. Consider it like a permanent change in the wiring of the brain where input and output differ from the normal.The variations are numerous.Assessment tries to identify strengths & weaknesses. Treatments are based on teaching to strong areas & avoiding the weak ones. Read more...

Who do you go to see if you you have possible autism spectrum disorder?

A Dr with Experience. Many specialties deal with this area. Some pediatricians, some psychiatrists, some family doctor, but some drs don't deal with this at all. A new professional group called maps (medical academy of pediatric special needs) focuses on this problem. . Talk to other parents who have children on the spectrum and find out who they have found to be helpful. Check parent support groups taca, & autism one. Read more...
Your regular doctor. Your regular, primary care physician, such as your family medicine doctor, your pediatrician, your adolescent medicine doctor, or your internist, is the best place to begin. She will be able to begin the evaluation process, answer many of your questions, decide if you need to see specialist such as a developmental pediatrician, a geneticist, a neurologist, a psychiatrist, or a team of experts. Read more...

Why might a speech language pathologist not work with a patient with autism spectrum disorder?

Rare event! An evaluation by an speech/lang path. Should be completed to determine social skill and communication needs. An appropriate treatment plan that meets the needs of the child & family can then be established. Treatment may include any combination of traditional speech & language approaches, augmentative & alternative communication, & behavioral interventions. Rule out hearing loss too! Read more...
Might not be needed. The only reason i can imagine they would not work with a patient on the autism spectrum is that they may feel they do not need any help or that it may not provide any additional benefit. I would ask the therapist directly their reason for not wanting to provide services. Read more...
Compliance & joint . Attention must be established first by intensive behavioral & educational interventions for a child with ASD to imitate gestures & sounds. Children >6 Y.O.Who have < 50 spontaneous functional words (e.g., used to get their needs met) may benefit more from a picture exchange system. Children >6 with normal cognitive skills (iq>70) may benefit more from group therapy for social communication. Read more...