My brother has developed acoustic neuroma. What is it exactly?

Tumor of ear nerve. It is a benign growth of the nerve that goes from the brain to the inner ear. It can cause hearing loss and dizziness. When small sometimes they can just be followed to make sure that they don't grow and cause problems. Other times they can be treated with radiation treatments and sometimes they need to be removed surgically. They are not malignant. They do not spread.

Related Questions

I've developed acoustic neuroma. What should I be watching out for in the future?

Hearing and balance. The area where this grows is small, so hearing and balance can be affected. Speak with your doctor as well as this is found on ct or MRI ususally. Read more...
Several things. As acoustic neuromas grow they typically cause hearing loss and tinnitus. They may also produce balance problems. If they get very large they may cause facial nerve paralysis or hydrocephalus which is too much fluid pressure in your head.Fortunately, if it is closely monitored, most of the more serious complications may be avoided by surgical removal or radiation treatment. Read more...

What is acoustic neuroma?

Balance nerve tumor. "acoustic neuroma" is actually a double misnomer: it is neither from the acoustic nerve nor is it a neuroma. It is actually a vestibular schwannoma: a benign tumor of the schwan cells (cells that wrap around and insulate nerves), not of the nerve itself, that grows off of / around the vestibular nerve, the nerve for balance, rather than the acoustic nerve or nerve of hearing. Read more...
Benign tumor . Acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor of the balance nerve. Treatments include observation, surgery, or radiation. Treatment is based in size of lesion, symptoms and age. Please see response to similar questions on this site. Read more...

Acoustic neuroma testing?

Hearing tests. Almost all acoustic neuromas are associated with hearing loss, but other neurological signs may be found on exam, including problems with gait, facial sensation, and double vision. Diagnosis can be confirmed, or excluded, by careful MRI films of the base of the brain. Read more...
The big 4. 1. History 2. Physical examination 3. Audiometry 4. Mri brain scanning (with special sequences) specialists most likely to help you would be ENT and neurology. If tumor is discovered, consider also seeing neurosurgeon. Read more...

Is acoustic neuroma painful?

No. Typically the main complaint people have if they have an acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) is hearing loss and/or tinnitus (ringing in the ear). Only if it is particularly large will patients complain of headaches. Read more...

How is acoustic neuroma treated?

Surgery. Although the actual choice of surgical approach is dependent upon different factors, acoustic neuromas are expanding tumors next to the brainstem. Besides hearing loss, such tumors cause a variety of bad things including death. Read more...
Several ways. Acoustic neuromas may be treated by observation, surgery, or radiation. The choice of treatment is based on the size of tumor, the presenting symptoms and the age of the patient. Read more...
Surgery or radiation. All can be treated by surgical resection or removal. Small and medium ones can be treated with radiation, typically "stereotactic radiosurgery" or gammaknife. Small ones can also be safely observed and not treated, but you should always follow your ents instructions on how frequently to obtain mris to check for growth (typically once every 6-12 months). Read more...
Surgery/Radiation. There are three main courses of treatment for acoustic neuroma: Observation Surgery Radiation therapy For more info: http://www.webmd.com/brain/acoustic-neuroma-causes-symptoms-treatments#2. Read more...

Do people die from an acoustic neuroma?

Rarely. Acoustic neuromas are slow growing benign tumors that rarely get to a size that can cause death. They are not cancers. Read more...
Sometimes. They are benign tumors that usually do not grow quickly. However, they have very few symptoms and sometimes are not found until they are quite large; they can also sometimes grow much more quickly than expected. In either case, if they compress the brainstem, they can be life treating. Read more...

What are the tests for acoustic neuroma?

Mri. Audiograms with differ ence in hearing between ears may require further evaluation, but MRI scan with contrast material remins gold standard for diagnosis of acoustic neuroma some centers may have "stacked abr" testing but not widely available. Read more...
Audiogram, MRI. Most evaluations start off with an audiogram or hearing test. When this test demonstrates a unilateral or asymmetric hearing loss (worse on one side), an MRI is usually the best study to obtain to determine if you have this tumor. Sometimes an MRI is obtained for another reason and this tumor is incidentally discovered in the process. Mris should always be obtained with contrast. Read more...