5 doctors weighed in:

What symptoms typically go along with carotid artery disease?

5 doctors weighed in
2 doctors agree

In brief: Risk of stroke

Carotid disease is a risk factor for stroke.
Prior to a stroke, a patient may have transient ischemic attacks (tias), which are brief episodes of weakness or numbness on one side of the body, coordination or speech difficulties. A specific TIA attributable to carotid disease is a brief loss of vision in one eye called amaurosis fugax. Treatment of asymptomatic carotid disease is controversial.

In brief: Risk of stroke

Carotid disease is a risk factor for stroke.
Prior to a stroke, a patient may have transient ischemic attacks (tias), which are brief episodes of weakness or numbness on one side of the body, coordination or speech difficulties. A specific TIA attributable to carotid disease is a brief loss of vision in one eye called amaurosis fugax. Treatment of asymptomatic carotid disease is controversial.
Dr. Jennifer Berkeley
Dr. Jennifer Berkeley
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Dr. Barry Bellovin
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Sometimes none

Carotid artery disease often causes no symptoms at all.
Sometimes it's detected accidentally, when a sound ("bruit") is heard in the neck, or a doppler is done because of non-specific symptoms such as dizziness. When it does cause symptoms, it's usually a temporary loss of vision in one eye, or a weakness or numbness on one side of the body.

In brief: Sometimes none

Carotid artery disease often causes no symptoms at all.
Sometimes it's detected accidentally, when a sound ("bruit") is heard in the neck, or a doppler is done because of non-specific symptoms such as dizziness. When it does cause symptoms, it's usually a temporary loss of vision in one eye, or a weakness or numbness on one side of the body.
Dr. Barry Bellovin
Dr. Barry Bellovin
Thank
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