12 doctors weighed in:

My grandfather died of lou gehrig disease, what are my chances of having this disease and what are some symptoms I should watch for?

12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Djamchid Lotfi
Neurology
7 doctors agree

In brief: NO !

This disorder is very rare and it is almost never hereditary.
Loss of muscle bulk, twitting of muscles, weakness and if it affects the brain stem speech, swallowing and later respiratory problems are the usual symptoms. Mental state, sensation and bladder control are not affected.

In brief: NO !

This disorder is very rare and it is almost never hereditary.
Loss of muscle bulk, twitting of muscles, weakness and if it affects the brain stem speech, swallowing and later respiratory problems are the usual symptoms. Mental state, sensation and bladder control are not affected.
Dr. Djamchid Lotfi
Dr. Djamchid Lotfi
Thank
Dr. Michio Abe
Internal Medicine
4 doctors agree

In brief: Lou Gehrig disease

Your chances of having lou gehrig disease or ALS just because your grandfather died from it would be low, especially if your grandfather is the only family member affected by it.
Only 5-10% of ALS is familial. Early symptoms may include twitching or cramping of muscles, muscle weakness affecting an arm or a leg, slurred speech, or difficulty chewing or swallowing.

In brief: Lou Gehrig disease

Your chances of having lou gehrig disease or ALS just because your grandfather died from it would be low, especially if your grandfather is the only family member affected by it.
Only 5-10% of ALS is familial. Early symptoms may include twitching or cramping of muscles, muscle weakness affecting an arm or a leg, slurred speech, or difficulty chewing or swallowing.
Dr. Michio Abe
Dr. Michio Abe
Thank

In brief: Very low risk

Do NOT focus on "watching for symptoms" as this is a very rare condition, and even less common is the familial variation.
Your grandfather's tragedy is not related to your risk of eventual ALS.

In brief: Very low risk

Do NOT focus on "watching for symptoms" as this is a very rare condition, and even less common is the familial variation.
Your grandfather's tragedy is not related to your risk of eventual ALS.
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Board Certified, Neurology
48 years in practice
55M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors