Sore throat and roof of mouth cough for 4 weeks?

Sore Throat. If the roof of your mouth and throat have been sore for a month they need to be checked. The typical healing time for most things is about 2 weeks. Either a dentist or physician would be a good starting place with the physician being your first choice.
Check with your doc. This may be gastric acid reflux or postnasal drip from sinusitis. Check with your doc. It can be fixed once a diagnosis is obtained. It also may be something rare - better be safe.

Related Questions

I am no longer achy but still experiencing really bad painful sore throat with cough and no white on tonsils. Swollen roof of mouth and facial pressur?

Viral Syndrome. The group of symptoms you mentioned point to a viral infection. The early phase known as a viral prodrome can consist of body aches and a blah feeling. This can be followed by general cold symptoms, sore throat cough, a stuffy and or runny nose. Fluids and Acetaminophen or ibuprophen can help with the sore throat, and cough. These symptoms generally resolve in 2-5 days. If not better see your doc. Read more...

I've got a lump/swallon gland on back of roof of mouth unsure what it can be? I've had sore throat from sinus drainage, now a dry cough\ itcy throat?

Lymph node. This may well be an enlarged lymph node responding to the infection, but without seeing it this would only be a guess. The best thing for you to do is to let a doctor take a look at this and make sure it is not an abscess, a tumor, or something else severe. Good luck. Read more...

Hello, I have sore raised red areas on roof of mouth, sore throat, a Cough more so morning & night, green phlegm. But no fever or anything else?

Upper Respiratory. All of those are symptoms of an upper respiratory infection. Generally speaking this is viral and is treated with OTC medications for symptoms. If it persists past 10 days, you develop a fever over 101 or become short of breath then there may be involvement of your lungs. This usually clears on its own in 7-10 days. Read more...

Sore throat spots on roof of mouth headache coughing and tired aching joints but no fever now had since last sunday six days?

Possible mononucleos. You need to see a doctor or dentist to get a proper diagnosis but the symptoms you describe could be mono or strep throat or primary herpes type one infection. It may also be a simple cold virus. Usually bacterial infections result in a fever. Read more...
Oral herpes. It sounds like you have an outbreak of cold sores - herpes simplex type 1. Outbreaks occur in times of stress, like when you have the flu. Read more...
Virus. Could be a secondary hermetic outbreak. Most people had the chicken pox as a child and have the herpes virus lying dormant in their system. A herpes outbreak in the mouth can look like little spots with a red ring around them. Give it a week to ten days and it may be gone. Read more...

Painless bump in roof of mouth and sore throat?

Bump and throat. Can be a lot of different things...One possibility is a torus (harmless bone that occurs in a lot of people) if it is is right in the middle. If it is near the teeth then you need an xray to see if nerve is okay. The sore throat has nothing to do with either of these possibilities. Call your dentist and or call your md to have both things checked out. Read more...
May not be related. These 2 symptoms may or may not be related. Sore throat may be flu or any upper respiratory tract infection. Could be from trauma. Virus or bacteria. Who knows? The bump? How long has it been there? Could be a natural bony growth. Could be a cyst. Could be a number of things. Please see an md or a dds in person for further answers. Read more...

Sore throat and red & swollen on roof of mouth?

May need strep. test/ culture. In the meantime - would gargle with warm salt water to reduce discomfort. Read more...
Internet diagnosis x. How long have you had that? any other symptoms? Very common complaints which cannot be diagnosed over the internet. Could be a common cold or 100 other things. Please wait it out and see if it goes away or consult your own primary care physician. Read more...