11 doctors weighed in:
How to you treat a herniated disc?
11 doctors weighed in

Dr. Marcel Hungs
Neurology
6 doctors agree
In brief: Many different ways
We usually combine physical therapy with pain management.
You may need an MRI of your spine to look at the slipped disk if you are not getting better. At times a focal pain injection or even surgery is needed to improve the pain.

In brief: Many different ways
We usually combine physical therapy with pain management.
You may need an MRI of your spine to look at the slipped disk if you are not getting better. At times a focal pain injection or even surgery is needed to improve the pain.
Dr. Marcel Hungs
Dr. Marcel Hungs
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Dr. Michael Bolesta
Orthopedic Surgery
4 doctors agree
In brief: Depends
If it is early (less than 6 weeks of symptoms), medication, gentle exercise, activity adjustment may be enough.
More severe pain may prompt an injection. If it causes serious nerve problems such as inability to empty the bladder or severe weakness, surgery may be the best answer. Most disk herniations get better over 6-12 weeks. Surgery is for more severe problems or failure to improve.

In brief: Depends
If it is early (less than 6 weeks of symptoms), medication, gentle exercise, activity adjustment may be enough.
More severe pain may prompt an injection. If it causes serious nerve problems such as inability to empty the bladder or severe weakness, surgery may be the best answer. Most disk herniations get better over 6-12 weeks. Surgery is for more severe problems or failure to improve.
Dr. Michael Bolesta
Dr. Michael Bolesta
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Dr. William Lizarraga
Internal Medicine
2 doctors agree
In brief: Meds, PT, Time
Most cases will resolve spontaneously, and as long as no alarm symptoms are present (fever, weight loss, anesthesia, severe weakness) can be management by avoiding activities that trigger pain, anti-inflammatory drugs (naproxyn, eg), and stretching or physical therapy.
These plus time will resolve the majority of cases.

In brief: Meds, PT, Time
Most cases will resolve spontaneously, and as long as no alarm symptoms are present (fever, weight loss, anesthesia, severe weakness) can be management by avoiding activities that trigger pain, anti-inflammatory drugs (naproxyn, eg), and stretching or physical therapy.
These plus time will resolve the majority of cases.
Dr. William Lizarraga
Dr. William Lizarraga
Thank
Dr. Qamar Khan
Pain Management
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Depends
If you've done the physical therapy and no relief, then injections like epidural steroid injections or facet joint injections may be the next treatment options.
There is growing evidence that stem cell therapies can also be helpful and heal tissues but are not covered by insurance at this time.

In brief: Depends
If you've done the physical therapy and no relief, then injections like epidural steroid injections or facet joint injections may be the next treatment options.
There is growing evidence that stem cell therapies can also be helpful and heal tissues but are not covered by insurance at this time.
Dr. Qamar Khan
Dr. Qamar Khan
Thank
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