Which treatment works the best and fastest for testicular torsion?

Surgery. Testicular torsion is a surgical emergency and requires immediate surgical repair to prevent loss of that testicle.
Timely surgery... Timely surgery to either fix or remove the affected testis is best and fastest to serve individual needs.
Testicle torsion. The only acceptable treatment for true testicular torsion is surgery. In the procedure they untwist the blood vessel that is compromised and suture the testicle so that it cannot twist in the same way again.
Fastest n permanent. Fastest treatment for testis torsion is to untwist testis through the scrotum. Almost always twisting testis in direction like opening a book. Surgery to untwist testicle and suture it to scrotal wall should be performed asap to prevent testis death, hopefully within 6 hours of occurrence. You have some time testicle was manually untwisted, but should be fixed soon thereafter to avoid retorsion.

Related Questions

Is there a cure for testicular torsion?

Yes + treat soon. Torsion can be intermittent or more commonly torsion leaves spermatic cord twisted with blood flow through testis arrested. Torsion can be cured/corrected if treated asap. This means an operation to untwist testis and fix it with sutures to the inner scrotal wall. Untreated results in testicuular death. Correction in < 6hours usually has a happy outcome, seldom in torsion is older than 12 hours. Read more...
Yes. Torsion can sometimes be "untorted" manually. If it can't be untwisted you shoul have surgery to untwist it. You have 6 hours to save the testis. If you wait longer than that it " goodbye testis". Read more...
Here are some ... The underlying cause for testicular torsion is inborn inadequate fixation of testes so there is no medical cure but surgery to fix it forever - orchiopexy; that can be called "cure" if you will. More detail? Ask Doc timely. Read more...

What can be expected after treatment for testicular torsion?

Depends. If the problem was diagnosed and treated quickly (surgically), blood flow to the testis should have been maintained and testicular function should be intact. If treatment was delayed, the testicle may have "died" and lost function. See fp/surgeon about testicular function/blood flow tests. Read more...
TORTION. Tortion, after surgical correction or relief can result in a smaller, atrophic testis. Often the other side is tacked to the scrotal wall to prevent it from happening. Usually a few weeks of pain and activity restriction is required. Read more...
Pain and swelling... Pain and swelling in surgical site are expected, but can be easily managed with reassurance and judicious use of pain medication with expected slow resolution in 1-3 weeks. Of course, individual postop course may vary. Read more...

Does no severe pain rule out regular testicular torsion? (not referring to intermittent testicular torsion since that doesn't need immediate surgery)

Yes it does. Testicular torsion results from twisting of the spermatic cord to the testicle resulting in cutting off the blood supply to the tedticle. This results in severe pain that is unrelenting . . Read more...

Why doesn't testicular torsion occur as often after the age of 18 - 19?

It occurs at any age. Testicular torsion is an extremely painful emergency condition in which the testicle is not anchored properly in the scrotum. The testicle can twist so that the blood supply is cut off or reduced causing sudden severe pain and swelling. It can occur at any age but is most common in young children and teenagers. Read more...

Any ideas why doesn't testicular torsion occur as much after the age of 19?

Unclear, but... Real reason is unclear, but fact/experience tells it occurs in men with inborn poor fixation to the sac so to form so-called bell-clapper deformity of testis. While its peak age around 15-19, it may occur at any age. Based the timing of its occurrence, it has been construed that hyperactivity of cremasteric muscles of spermatic cord may be prone to incite its twisting. Read more...

Testicular torsion how common?

Depends on age. Testicular torsion has two peak incidences: a small one in the neonatal period and a large one during puberty, but it can occur at any age. The incidence is estimated to be 1 in 4000 in males younger than 25 years old. Approximately 65% of cases occur in boys between the ages of 12 and 18 years. Read more...