16 doctors weighed in:

What kind of pills or treatment can somebody get for traveler's diarrhea?

16 doctors weighed in
Dr. Sarah Kohl
Travel Medicine
14 doctors agree

In brief: Antibiotics

Traveler's diarrhea(td) is a bacterial diarrhea spread in water and food.
Different countries have different bacteria with different susceptibility to antibiotics. The symptoms of diarrhea can be treated with loperamide, but the bacterial cause has several different antibiotics recommended. Talk with your travel medicine specialist to get up-to-date advice. It is best to learn to prevent td.

In brief: Antibiotics

Traveler's diarrhea(td) is a bacterial diarrhea spread in water and food.
Different countries have different bacteria with different susceptibility to antibiotics. The symptoms of diarrhea can be treated with loperamide, but the bacterial cause has several different antibiotics recommended. Talk with your travel medicine specialist to get up-to-date advice. It is best to learn to prevent td.
Dr. Sarah Kohl
Dr. Sarah Kohl
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2 comments
Dr. Patricia Roy
Old quote from Travel Medicine, which is one of my special interests...."When traveling, and faced with a meal choice, cook it, peel it, boil it, or forget it!" Great advice.......and along with good hand-washing, will prevent most TD.
Dr. Katharine Garnier
You need to see your doctor if you get diarrhea after traveling, as you can also pick up parasites, which are treated differently than the typical bacteria. I agree, best is to try to avoid it..remember, no ice in your drinks either!
Dr. Joseph Eastern
Dermatology
2 doctors agree

In brief: May not be needed

Most cases of td are mild and resolve in a few days without treatment, but antibiotics and antimotility drugs such as loperamide and diphenoxylate can be prescribed when needed.
Severe or protracted cases may result in significant fluid loss and dangerous electrolytic imbalance. Adequate fluid intake (with purified water) is essential, whether drugs are used or not.

In brief: May not be needed

Most cases of td are mild and resolve in a few days without treatment, but antibiotics and antimotility drugs such as loperamide and diphenoxylate can be prescribed when needed.
Severe or protracted cases may result in significant fluid loss and dangerous electrolytic imbalance. Adequate fluid intake (with purified water) is essential, whether drugs are used or not.
Dr. Joseph Eastern
Dr. Joseph Eastern
Thank
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