What kind of doctor sees somebody for breast carcinoma?

Several. General surgeons provide surgical treatment, oncologists use chemotherapy, radiation oncologists supervise radiation treatment and family doctors coordinate overall care.

Related Questions

Give me a hint. What kind of hassle am I facing if doc suspects breast carcinoma? What is required to diagnose?

Life saving. The usual first step after a concerning clinical breast exam is a mammogram and possibly an ultrasound. If there are abnormal findings on those tests, then either a short term follow-up study or a biopsy of some sort - needle biopsy, incisional biopsy, lumpectomy, etc - may be indicated. If the mammogram / sonograms are normal, but the abnormal physical exam persists, then a biopsy is warranted. Read more...
Breast biopsy. For most patients who are found to have a "suspicious" abnormality on mammography (or examination), the biggest hassle is the waiting period between being told this and the definitive diagnosis. The best way to diagnose a suspicious abnormality is by a non-surgical needle biopsy, either done by a breast surgeon or radiologist. The sooner you know, the sooner you can put this to rest. Read more...
Hassles include: Mammogram; further imaging (u/s, mri), biopsy. If 'cancer', is it invasive or confined to duct (dcis)? Most have choice of breast conservation or mastectomy. If lumpectomy, you may need radiotherapy if you want to keep your breast. All lumps emoved are tested for receptors. Hormones and chemotherapy depend on these, and presence of lymph nodes. These hassles can save your life. Read more...
More comfort. Bottom line is that mammograms are now more woman friendly. Soft pads can be used to soften the tightness of the machine, many techs are sensitive to draping women with respect and reassuring during the exam, biopsies can be done with good local pain/anesthesia control. Also american cancer society and others have a variety of support groups about women's breast health and breast cancer treatment. Read more...

Should I go see my doctor if I think I might have breast cancer?

Yes. Over the age of 40, you should have annual mammograms, and annual doctor exam of your breasts. You should perform monthly self breast exam as well. If you still concerned about your breast health, in between your routine doctor visits and routine screening tests, then you should see your doctor anyway. Read more...

What are the main symptoms doctors see in breast cancer?

Painless mass. If you are not alert to a dominant mass in your breast, you will not have other symptoms until the disease is advanced. Despite all the promotion of mammogram-machines and costly screening, the best thing you can do at your age is get into the monthly self-exam habit. Good luck and stay pro-active. Read more...
Good question. The unfortunate thing about breast cancer is that it almost never causes symptoms or physical findings early. That is why mammogram is so important. The great majority of breast cancers are now diagnosed before they cause symptoms. The earliest a tumor can be felt is when it is about 1 cm in diameter if you are thin. By the time it reaches that size it has been present for about 2-3 years. Read more...
Breast lump, etc. . The most common sign/symptom is the presence of a lump in the breast. Other symptoms include nipple discharge, nipple inversion, skin indentation, and breast pain. Nevertheless, the majority of people diagnosed with breast cancer have no symptoms whatsoever. The best way to diagnose breast cancer early is to have routine screening mammograms beginning at age 40. Read more...

Which type of doctor works with breast cancer?

Team approach. There are many members of the team: breast surgeon/general surgeon, medical oncologist, radiation oncologist, plastic surgeon, navigator, radiologist, pathologist and oncology nurse. With this team approach, you will have a well coordinated course of treatment with optimal outcomes. Read more...

If my mom and both grandmas had breast cancer, should I go see a doctor if I am now experiencing a lump under my right armpit?

It depends. Any lump in your body requires medical attention for verification and in order to determine its significance and make a correct diagnosis. Breast cancer does occur, although very rarely, in 20 year olds, so I would advise you to get yourself examined or share this info with your family/friends who can support you and make sure that your health is OK. Read more...

Just diagnosed with breast carcinoma. Had many questions on the way home but doctor is gone now. Can you tell me about the condition?

Not in 400 words. Write down your questions and go back to your doctor. If he/she is not kind and supportive find another doc. It is important that you understand. Susan love's breast book is a little out of date but is well written . See if your hospital has a library that you can use for additional help. Be careful of what "friends" tell you. Advice may be worth what you pay for it! Read more...
Abnormal cell growth. Breast cancer like most cancers are conditions in which ductal or other cells multiple and divide more rapidly than normal. It can "spread" to lymph nodes, blood, bone, liver, and brain if not caught early and treated.There are many causes such as radiation to the breast. Smokers have a higher risk. Make a list of your questions for your next doctor;s visit and ask permission to tape record answers. Read more...
Unless you can be. Much more specific, it's probably best to: 1. Write the questions down so you don't forget; 2. Make another appointment; 3. Go with a spouse, partner, friend, relative with another pair of ears to check if you hear the same answers. Get back to us here to clarify. Can't do 30 min discussion in a paragrgaph. Read more...

I always forget to ask my doctor about how to prevent breast carcinoma. Are there some steps I should be taking?

Some. About 1 in 8 women will develope breast cancer. There is probably little that you can do to decrease that risk. However, besides family history as a risk factor fo breast cancer - there is some increased risk in smokers, drinkers, and overweight women - factors you can modify to effect some decrease in your risk for breast cancer. For early detection do you mammograms as recommended. Read more...
Diet exercise. Low fat diet and keeping your weight down may help. Avoid a lot of alcohol. Probably should not take estrogen replacement continually for many years. Remember that 1 in 7 women get breast cancer - and most can't be prevented. Get your mammograms. In this case, early detection is a reality and prevention is only a hope. Read more...
Facetious answer.. Have a late menarche, be pregnant a lot, have an early menopause, and select parents from a family that does not have breast or ovarian cancer. Screening after age 40 help early detection. Do not use birth control pills (iud ok) or postmenopausal estrogens. All are from genetics and estrogen stimulation. Some radically advise prophylactic bilateral mastectomy. Read more...