12 doctors weighed in:
What does it mean if I have urticaria?
12 doctors weighed in

Dr. Robert Zemble
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
4 doctors agree
In brief: Hives
Urticaria is simply the medical term for hives.
It can be classified as acute (short term) or chronic (greater than ~6 weeks). Acute urticaria could be due to (but not limited) to allergic or infectious in nature. In contrast, chronic daily hives are not typically due to an external allergy.

In brief: Hives
Urticaria is simply the medical term for hives.
It can be classified as acute (short term) or chronic (greater than ~6 weeks). Acute urticaria could be due to (but not limited) to allergic or infectious in nature. In contrast, chronic daily hives are not typically due to an external allergy.
Dr. Robert Zemble
Dr. Robert Zemble
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Dr. Amy Shah
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
4 doctors agree
In brief: Hives
Urticaria is the medical term for hives.
Usually, an itchy rash with raised red spots. Often it's caused by an allergic reaction but can also be from having an infection etc. An allergist can test you for possible causes and treatments.

In brief: Hives
Urticaria is the medical term for hives.
Usually, an itchy rash with raised red spots. Often it's caused by an allergic reaction but can also be from having an infection etc. An allergist can test you for possible causes and treatments.
Dr. Amy Shah
Dr. Amy Shah
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Dr. Luis Matos
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
4 doctors agree
In brief: Aka hives...
If you have urticaria, you have some form of allergic reaction.
There are many different things that bring on the itchy skin patches. Viral infectios(most common in children); medication, food, environmental, etc...Allergies; internal autoimmune, physical factors(exercise, hot or cold exposure, scratching and others), rarely hidden internal tumors or autoimmune conditions can cause you to react.

In brief: Aka hives...
If you have urticaria, you have some form of allergic reaction.
There are many different things that bring on the itchy skin patches. Viral infectios(most common in children); medication, food, environmental, etc...Allergies; internal autoimmune, physical factors(exercise, hot or cold exposure, scratching and others), rarely hidden internal tumors or autoimmune conditions can cause you to react.
Dr. Luis Matos
Dr. Luis Matos
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1 comment
Dr. Martin Raff
You can also get recurrent urticarial eruptions with parasitic infections. In the U.S. notably Strongyloidiasis
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