Can my breast implants leak fluid into my milk?

No. This is highly unlikely. The implant would first have to rupture, then leak, and the contents then would have to enter the milk ducts.
Not likely at all. Implants are "walled off" by scar tissue naturally when they are placed. Even with rupture, this is not likely.
Insignificant. The amount of silicone released into breast milk is generally negligible.
Extremely unlikely. If saline implants, fluid will be resorbed from the pocket without sequelae. If silicone implants, new gels are called 'cohesive' because they stick together even when outside the shell. An extensive study of implants by the nih showed no higher levels of silicone in the milk of mothers with implants than in those without.
No. It has been proven to be safe to breast feed after having implants.
No. The implant is isolated from the breast tissue whether it is placed under the gland or under the muscle by the capsule. The capsule is simply scar tissue that your body uses to isolate any foreign object- so there is no way any material could get into milk.
No. Breast implants do not have a connection to the milk glands or milk ducts. If the implants leak, the material would be outside of the glands or ducts.

Related Questions

Is there anyway to make your breast implants from leaking or rupturing?

Breast Implant Leak. As with any prosthetic devise, proper protection and care are necessary. Saline implants have a small percent of rupture which increases with the time that the implant is in place. Trauma from fall, breast or chest wall impact or from sudden deceleration due to air bags or seat belts have been reported. The newer silicone implants have semi-solid gel and are less likely to leak due to trauma. Read more...
No. Breast implants are a mechanical device that does not have an infinite life span. The walls do break down with time. Most often implants do not break from trauma or falls, just time. The rupture rate for a saline implant is about 10% in 10 years. For silicone it is 10% in 17 years. Read more...
No sure fire way. There are no definitive ways to stop your breast implants from leaking or rupturing but soon "semi-solid" implants will be available. These are also known as gummy bear implants. These are more likely to fracture than actually leak. Some patients do not like the firmness in early clinical trials but this is the only way to avoid a "leak". Read more...
Not Life Long. Breast implants are like your car's tires in a small way: they both eventually wear out. Some women will wear them out before others, but as long as you live long enough, additional surgery awaits. The secondary operations can be very minor however if planned properly. :). Read more...
Everything fails. Any man made product will eventually wear out, break or stop working. Implants are no exception - when they get old, the shell becomes more brittle, and more likely to tear. Whatever is inside (saline or silicone) can then leak out. So, implants are not "lifetime devices". They have to be replaced at some point in the future. Read more...

If you were to have silicon breast implants and they started leaking how fast would you need to have them removed?

When you want. This is an elective operation --meaning when you want to have it done. There is no evidence that the leaking silicone is dangerous or harmful, despite previous studies in the 1980s and 1990s suggesting that it was. However, it is easier for your surgeon to get the leaking silicone out of your tissues if there is less of it, so sooner is probably better, but it is not an emergency! Read more...
As soon as safe. This is not an emergency but removal is genrally recommended when it is recognized. However, due to the current form stage implants it may be difficult to assess for rupture based on physical exam alone (called silent rupture) which gas prompted the fda to recommend periodic MRI testing at 3 years and ever 2 years thereafter to screen for implant rupture. Read more...
Sooner than later. While not an emergency, they should be removed when you are fit enough to do so. Call your local board certified plastic surgeon. They will guide you through this. Read more...
Soon. Although not an emergency, i think that it is best to remove free silicone as soon as safely possible. Although there are no specific guidelines, i suggest my patients try to do so within the first month after diagnosis. Best wishes. Read more...

How fast I have to removed my leaked silicon implant cause am breast feeding and does silicon go with milk to my baby?

Not that easy. I would need more information to make a recommendation. How old are your implants? How extensive is the rupture? Is the implant over or under the muscle? Many of these will influence the recommendations to be made, . It is possible for the silicone to leak into the breast milk but the truth is that the conpsequences of this are likely to be few, if any. Formula has 400 x the silicone of breast milk. Read more...

My doctor told me not to breast fed from my leaked silicon implant in my left breast why? Is silicon interfer with milk and go to my 8 month baby?

Not likely!! A leaked silicon implant would not necessarily deposit anything in the milk ducts of the mammary gland. I would think it perfectly safe for your baby to feed, a great relief to you and baby. If there are still doubts, use a breast pump on the affected breast and submit the sample to a clinical lab to check for any contamination. I'd bet it shows nothing but "breast milk"! Read more...
Remove ruptured . It is recommended by the fda that ruptured implants be removed. Free silicone may be contained in the capsule or scar tissue around the implant, or if it gets out your body will wall it off as a lump or granuloma making it more difficult to remove with more loss of tissue. Insurance usually pays for removal of defective implants and see if the implants are warrantied by the manufacturer. Read more...

If you have breast implants and start taking birth control will your breast get bigger from fluid?

No. If your breasts increase in size, it's not due to increases in fluid. Read more...
Estrogen sensitivity. Yes, it is possible for your breasts to become significantly larger when taking oral contgraceptives after breast implant surgery. While part of this may be due to edema (fluid) other components of the breast such as the gland or fat may also contribute to the overall size increase and willbe a function of your specific sensitivity to estrogen, breast receptors, and the estrogen content of bcp. Read more...
No. Breasts may respond to the use of oral contraceptives by increasing in size; this increase in size is related to tissue response to hormones ( estrogen), not necessarily accumulation of fluid. Read more...

Will insurance cover breast implants?

In certain cases. In certain cases, yes, insurance will pay for breast implants. Specifically, patients who are undergoing reconstruction following breast cancer treatment, for instance. Read more...
Sometimes. If the implants are being use to correct a deformity such as after breast cancer then yes. For cosmetic purposes no. Read more...
Implants-insurance. The only time breast implants are covered by insurance is if they are used for reconstructive purposes, e.g,, after breast removal (mastectomy) for cancer, or for a birth defect. Read more...
It depends. Implants for reconstructive problems, like breast reconstruction after mastectomy, would be covered. Implants for purely cosmetic concerns, like wanting a larger breast size, would not be typically covered by insurance. Best to speak with a board-certified plastic surgeon about your concerns. Read more...

What does hardening of breast implants mean?

Scar tissue. Hardening of breast implants is a condition called capsular contracture.The body forms scar tissue around the implants, it tightens and makes the implant feel hard and sometimes painful. Your surgeon can discuss possible options to correct this. Read more...
Encapsulation. This usually occurs when the scar tissue around the breast implants (capsule) thickens and/or calcifies. This abnormal thickening can cause the breasts to feel firm and may be associated with pain and/or breast implant distortion or displacement. Read more...
Capsular contracture. Capsule is the scar the develops after placement of breast implant as a body response, the scar can thicken and harden resulting in tightening , hardening and breast deformity. It can be prevented by early breast massage known as breast exercises after placement. Homeopathic milk thistle can be used and has been shown to soften the scar. Other medications under direction of md can be used as well. Read more...
Many possible causes. It may be caused by a variety of different reasons that will vary by timing after surgery. Soon after surgery could mean a hematoma or seroma or muscle spasm. Delayed causes likely relate to capsular contracture or possible inflammation. Read more...

Removal of breast implants needed in all women?

No. Breast implants only need to be removed if there is a problem: significant capsular contracture, leakage, deflation, or rarely, infection. No problem, no removal necessary. Read more...
No. Breast implants only "need" to be removed if there is something wrong with the integrity of the implant such as a leak in a silicone implant.There is the option at that time of having it replaced or simply removed without replacement. Saline implants don't really "need" to be removed even if they leak, although the cosmetic result could be poor. Infected implants of any type need to be removed. Read more...
Not necessarily . With the current state of the art, implants may fail over your lifetime but that also means they may not. If ruptured or if other complications develop, you will certainly want to remove/replace the implants when problems occur. However , in the absence of complications there is no need to remove them. In the future, fat transfer may offer a longer term solution. Read more...
Probably. Depending on how young you are when you put them in and how long you live it is best to plan that some time in the future the implants you have now will either need to be removed or replaced. As imperfect as these devices are most women with failing implants choose to replace them if that is any indication of their popularity. Read more...
No. No, breast implant removal is not necessary unless the breast implants are causing a specific problem, have leaked, and/or the patient chooses to have them removed. On the other hand, patients who are planning on undergoing initial breast augmentation surgery should be aware that additional surgery related to their breast implants ( for a variety of reasons) may be necessary in their lifetimes. Read more...