11 doctors weighed in:
My sister says she has rotator cuff syndrome. Are family members more likely to get the same thing?
11 doctors weighed in

Dr. Robert Purchase
Orthopedic Surgery
4 doctors agree
In brief: No
There is no definable family connection with rotator cuff syndrome.
This shoulder problem is a result of many different factors, including the individual way that you are built and the way that you use your shoulder. I assume that there are similarities between the shoulders of sisters but it is not the extent that you have a greater risk than the anyone else. Although it is a common problem.

In brief: No
There is no definable family connection with rotator cuff syndrome.
This shoulder problem is a result of many different factors, including the individual way that you are built and the way that you use your shoulder. I assume that there are similarities between the shoulders of sisters but it is not the extent that you have a greater risk than the anyone else. Although it is a common problem.
Dr. Robert Purchase
Dr. Robert Purchase
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Dr. Jeffrey Sider
Sports Medicine
2 doctors agree
In brief: Not genetic
Rotator cuff syndrome is typically an inflammation in one of the tendons of the rotator cuff.
It is often related to overuse with motion such as serving a tennis ball or throwing a baseball. Often it can be treated with rest, ice and nsaids. Strengthening of the rotator cuff muscles can also be done to help prevent re- currence in symptoms.

In brief: Not genetic
Rotator cuff syndrome is typically an inflammation in one of the tendons of the rotator cuff.
It is often related to overuse with motion such as serving a tennis ball or throwing a baseball. Often it can be treated with rest, ice and nsaids. Strengthening of the rotator cuff muscles can also be done to help prevent re- currence in symptoms.
Dr. Jeffrey Sider
Dr. Jeffrey Sider
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Dr. Amir Khan
Sports Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes likely
Although the exact genetic component has not been determined, people with relatives who have experienced rotator cuff tears are at increased risk of similar tendon tears themselves, according to a study published in the may 2009 issue of the journal of bone and joint surgery (jbjs).
“this strongly suggests genetic predisposition as a possible cause for rotator cuff disease”.

In brief: Yes likely
Although the exact genetic component has not been determined, people with relatives who have experienced rotator cuff tears are at increased risk of similar tendon tears themselves, according to a study published in the may 2009 issue of the journal of bone and joint surgery (jbjs).
“this strongly suggests genetic predisposition as a possible cause for rotator cuff disease”.
Dr. Amir Khan
Dr. Amir Khan
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Dr. Gregory Harvey
Orthopedic Surgery
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Rotator cuff
No. Rotator cuff syndrome is not hereditary.

In brief: Rotator cuff
No. Rotator cuff syndrome is not hereditary.
Dr. Gregory Harvey
Dr. Gregory Harvey
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