Is the stellate ganglion block a risky thing to do?

Risk vs benefit . All injections for pain have some risk. A sgb is fairly low risk if done by a skilled physician. The benefits of such a block can be great. See a board certified pain specialist.
Depends. This block have to be done under image (ultrasound, x-ray) guidance to avoid complications.
Stellate . There are risks associated with the block. In well trained hands and under either x-ray or ultrasound the risks are low. Nothing is ever too risky it all depends on how bad your symptoms and pain are - then its a matter of weighing the risks and the benefits.
Can Be. All your major blood vessels going to you head are right there so if your doctor has not performed these a lot or does not use X-ray or ultrasound guidance you could be at risk for intravascular injection which can result in a seizure if the anesthetic makes it to your brain.

Related Questions

How long does the stellate ganglion block take?

Fairly quick. Including time to get you sedated it should take less than 15 minutes. Read more...
5 Minutes. Many experienced operators can do without sedation about as fast as a immunization! Read more...
Maybe 10-15 min. to perform, however the effects of the block can take a few min to and hour. Read more...

Do you have information on the ' stellate ganglion block' injections?

CRPS. Used for treatment of rsd or complex regional pain syndrome, injection blocks the parasympathetic nerve flow to the upper extremity on the side of the injection. If patient has reflex sympathetic dystrophy the injection should reduce or eliminate their symptoms. Read more...
Stellate Block. A stellate ganglion block blocks the sympathetic nerves that go to the arms, and, to some degree, the sympathetic nerves that go to the face. This may in turn reduce pain, swelling, color and sweating changes in the upper extremity and may improve mobility. It is done as a part of the treatment of Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD), Sympathetic Maintained Pain and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. Read more...

Are there any alternatives to a stellate ganglion block?

Depends . You didn't tell us the reason. These blocks are used for a number of things but mostly for certain chronic pain syndromes. If you've run out of meds to try, then the block may be the next best alternative. Read more...
Possibly. You don't mention why you are being considered for stellate blocks. Usually these are done for post-traumatic pain syndromes due to sympathatic nerve problems. Medications like amitriptyline, steroids, Nifedipine can help, but the nerve blocks seem to provide the quickest waya to improve pain. Read more...
Can try. Accupuncture as an alternative. More invasive you be something like spinal cord stimulation. Read more...

I am veteran with severe PTSD. I've read that "Stellate Ganglion Block" has had high success rates treating other vets. Who should I see to try this?

See your doctor . Thank you for your service! Also, thank you for this question. You may want to start with your primary physician for a referral to an anesthesiologist skilled at this procedure. From what I have read, some people get immediate results and others get no response. If you are treated in the VA system, a large tertiary care center will be your best bet. . Read more...
Still experimental. This is still undergoing study. The early promising results were from uncontrolled trials (case reports). More recent studies have been unable to replicate the results. It isn't clear YET if positive effects reported in case studies were simply placebo effects, or if there are some people, yet unidentified, who respond well to the treatment. As mentioned, discuss your interest with your physician. Read more...

Can you do a stellate ganglion block and celiac plexus block at the same time?

You are asking for. Trouble, you could do them together but sometime this could cause low blood pressure and ther is a case of paraplegia happenend from that. Read more...
Yes. Both blocks can be performed at the same time. However, it is up to the pain management specialist to make recommendations regarding the timing of the two procedures. Read more...
Stellate celiac. Anything is possible. But medical common sense dictates that you should not have both at the same time. I certainly would not. I usually would wait one week between the two. Read more...
Typically No. The amount of anesthetic needed for both could out you at risk for toxicity which can be a big problem. Read more...

Had stellate ganglion block done on friday for inappropriate sinus tachycardia. Just had left side done have not had much effect do both need done?

Yes need both sides. Bilateral stellate ganglion block will help , need to be don few times , is less invasive than other treatment sinus ablation and permanent pace maker. Wait till the other side is done before coming to conclusion. Read more...

Is a stellate ganglion block appropriate for postherpetic neuralgia along the trigeminal nerve.

Yes indicated. Herpes zoster ' shingles' after blisters healed in some will have severe disabling pains will lost for months and months which most likely you have involving one of the trigeminal nerve branch, the virus stays in nerve root for ever. Image guided cervicothoracic sym. Ganglion block along with t.N block most likely will help your pain , is relatively low risk procedure in trained hands. Read more...
Maybe. This is a difficult problem with not always a good solution. Many meds have been tried and should be tried, and there is a vaccine. The stellate nerve blocks are usually for peripherial nerve neuralgia, not cranial nerve problems, but it may be worth a try if nothing else is helping. Read more...
It is a Reasonable. option. If not helpful, then consider a sphenopalatine or trigeminal ganglion block. Read more...

I'm having a procedure called stellate ganglion block for inappropriate sinus tachycardia do you know much about this procedure and if its successful?

Very. Under image guidance and with a pain management doctor with experience works well. Read more...
Yes. A stellate ganglion block involves injecting local anesthetics to the sympathetic nerves in your neck. This procedure is typically done for reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the arms or upper body. If it is performed by a trained physician on appropriately selected patients, it can be very successful in the treatment of sympathetically mediated pain of the upper extremities. Read more...