Can the daily use of activated charcoal during radiation therapy for prostate cancer help me?

I take care of many. Prostate cancer patients with radiotherapy, external beam and seed implants, and I have never used "activated charcoal" properly done, the risk of rectal bleeding at 2-5 years post treatment is <5% in my hands as i deliver treatment. Bleeding during radiotherapy is not commonly more than "worsened hemorrhoids". Do not understand rationale for charcoal, and do not use it. Talk to your doc; ask f.
Activated charcoal. Activated charcoal can be used in water filtration. There is no evidence that activated charcoal can help to aid in making the radiation work more effectively or prevent side effects. The most effective way of maximizing effect of radiation while minimizing side effects is to drink 64 oz water and keeping the patient's bladder consistently full and maintaining a low fiber diet treatment.

Related Questions

I had radiation therapy for prostate cancer 10 years ago. Since I've had psa tests yearly. The last three years the psa has risen 0.1, 0.4, 0.5. Does th?

Prostate cancer. A small percent of rad treated pts will recur even this late. A urological eval is warranted. At your age that small amount of psa elevation should not affect your longevity.. Read more...
Rising PSA&CA. I have followed many pts for nearly 20 years now after rt for prostate cancer. I definitely see a rise in the psa at about 8 years and again at 13 years. After each of these rises the psa levels off again and does not continue to climb exponentially. I have worked many a man up with lots of bone scans and cat scans and always find normal results. Read more...
At 85, very unlikely. Congratulate you for paddling alone well in coping with prostate cancer after radiation. Now you have rising PSA after definite treatment which may happen up to 45-50% of so treated patients but is usually inconsequential for longevity and quality of life, but occasionally few. So, keep on annual or biannual PSA + DRE (digital rectal exam). Besides, it is worthwhile to follow alkaline phosphatase. Read more...

Is it dangerous to have anal sex after having radiation therapy for prostate cancer?

No. The rectum is somewhat irritated during and shortly after radiation, so use of lubrication and common sense is recommended. If it hearts and is too irritated avoid till symptoms resolve. Read more...
Possibly. If the receptive partner has had prostate treatment (or anal cancer) there are risks. Radiated tisues are less pliant, and he anterio rectal wall has received quite a bit of radiotherapy treatment. At 3 years, about 5% of people suffer rectal bleeding form radiotherapy induced rectal injury. The active partner should not have any post radiotherapy effect as long as he is interested and potent. Read more...
It can be. There is fibrosis and mucosal changes after xrt, these can lead to pain and local tissue damage. It is also postulated as part of the reason homosexual men report greater debility and decreased quality of life following treatment. Read more...
Sex. Prostate cancer radiation may scar the anal sphicter and also make the surface lining of the rectum more friable or fragile. Take it slow ad use plenty of lubrication. Read more...
Here are some ... Any forms of sexual acts should be okay for a man after RT (radiotherapy + seed implant) as long as being comfortable & tolerable. Remember, as we age, all the tissue, especially after RT, will not be as elastic and strong as in young age; so, apply commonsense & use more lubricant but still watch for injury and possible contracting unwanted STDs. More? Ask Doc timely for more counseling. Read more...

Urine tested positive for blood said its normal for patients that had radiation therapy for prostate cancer also are ther any cancer cells in urine bl?

Cystoscopy. You need a urologic evaluation including ct scan and cystoscopy. It could be irritation from the prostate radiation but bladder cancer after prostate radiation is a possibility as well. The sooner you get evaluated, the better. Read more...
Possibly. Radiation therapy can cause inflammatory changes in the bladder which can result in microscopic blood in the urine. However a urine cytology should be performed to rule out possibly bladder abnormalities. Additionally, if the history of radiation therapy is in the past, then a cystoscopy (camera to look in your urethra and bladder) may be warranted. Please discuss further with your doctors. Read more...

Prostate cancer - are there side effects of radiation therapy?

Yes. Fatigue, urinary and bowel symptoms are common with external beam radiation but are typically mild and transient. Urinary symptoms may be more intense with "seeds" (brachytherapy) but quality of life studies show return to baseline symptoms within months after implant. Long term side effects may include blood in urine or stool or development of bladder cancer (after 10-20 years). Read more...
YES. External beam: skin becomes red, swollen, warm, and sensitive, as if sunburn which subsides gradually in four to six weeks. Possible side effects: erectile dysfunction and urinary symptoms of frequency, bleeding, or, rarely, incontinence. Read more...

How many radiation therapy sessions does prostate cancer usually take?

Around 35. This depends on the radiation oncologist but the standard external beam radiation to the prostate takes around 7 weeks with 5 treatments per week. The number may go up or down somewhat based of the individuals tolerance to the treatment and if the treatment was intensity modulated or 3d conformal. Read more...
40-45 fractions. With modern day image guided radiation therapy (igrt), the dose is pushed to or above 81 gray. This is about 40-45 fractions. This is the next generation to intensity modulated radiation therapy (imrt). Ulternative radiation (low number of fractions) using cyberknife for early stage prostate cancer can be given as low as 4 fractions. This is the spectrum of external beam radiation. Read more...
One or up to 45. External image guided radiation is the most costly at 40-45 sessions. Radiosurgery is 5 sessions, no long term results published costs 1/2 as much. One session of inserting radioactive seeds is literally just one time and costs 1/5. They all have the same effectiveness. It would be worth it to fly to a specialist who does seeds get a one session seed procedure versus taking 45 sessions. Read more...
Why variation? Today's radiation doctors can deliver more radiation to the prostate with lower side effects. Not everyone can get brachytherapy (gland size, disease risk outside capsule), and shorter courses with very high technology are offered. The number of treatments vary because of doctor's beliefs..Toxicity worries, control disease worries, and frankly some are business first folks. Trust someone 1st! Read more...

Could the radiation therapy for my prostate cancer be giving me radiation prostatitis?

Possibly. I'm not sure exactly what you are referring to by radiation prostatitis but if you are referring to increased urinary urgency and frequency then yes this is a possible acute side effect of radiation treatment to the prostate. This can be managed easily with some medications that can be given to you by your radiation oncologist. Read more...
Yes. Radiation can irritate the linings of the bladder and urethra which runs through the prostate. It can be treated easily with medication as any other prostatitis and advice of certain foods to avoid. A urine test should exclude an infection. Read more...
Or 'proctitis'? Medical words are confusing! the "itis" suffix means inflammation or irritation. The prostate itself can swell and irritate from radiotherapy, and there are medications to treat. The rectum is adjacent to the prostate, and when irritated, or inflamed, it is called proctitis. Sounds close, is close, very different treatment! Read more...
Yes. In fact, i explain to my patients that the irritation of the prostate after seed implants comes from two components. Mechanical prostatitis in the short term because of the physical procedure of putting the needles and seeds in the prostate, and radiation prostatitis because of the radioactivity of the seeds. In general all of this improves over about three months. Read more...

Dr. Bansal- I just completed 8 weeks of radiation therapy for an early stage of prostate cancer. It's safe to take turminc to prevent recurrances?

See below. I couldn't find turminc but if it's the same as turmeric, then this should help answer your question. Turmeric has shown in some early studies to be effective in preventing and treating some cancers, including prostate. However, the results are preliminary and no clear recommendations can be made as to timing and dosage. Consumption of small quantities in cooking shouldn't hurt though. Read more...
Safe, but effective? No studies I am aware of have shown turmeric to slow prostate cancer. I personally do not recommend supplements for my patients but I do not discourage them from taking something safe that they believe to be beneficial. As with lots of other phytochemicals, a benefit in a test tube does not translate into a real survival benefit. Talk to your medical oncologist or urologist prior to starting. Read more...

Which treatment is better for Prostate cancer - Stage 1? Surgery for prostate removal or Radiation therapy with some medication?

It is debatable. This is a common dilema as both treatment types(surgery and Radiotherapy) give equally good results. The chocie between the two is based on your Age and personal preference. I would advise you to meet with both specialists ,and go for surgery if your age is. Read more...