How fast can I make my obstructive sleep apnea go away?

Fast. Symptoms can be quickly relieved with a device called cpap, CPAP will greatly help symptoms, this is a mask that applies a low level of air pressure to the airway keeping it from blocking during sleep and effectively treats sleep apnea. Symptoms improve quickly after treatment. Weight loss will help dramatically. Loss of even 10-15% of body weight can help. A rate of 1-1.5 lbs/ week loss is safe.
You can't. Obstructive sleep apnea rarely goes away. It however can be managed and symptoms start to reduce as soon as treatment is started. While a CPAP breathing machine is the gold standard of treatment, due to compliance issues, an oral appliance can be the treatment of choice according to the american academy of sleep medicine.
Symptoms - Fast. Your apnea won't go away (without surgery), but treatment can quickly resolve symptoms. Make sure you are evaluated and treated by an experienced sleep doctor.
Sleep apnea. Mandibular advancement has shown great results. This procedure opens up the posterior airway significantly.

Related Questions

Will obstructive sleep apnea stop me from going on my vacation?

No. You just have to take your sleep apnea machine with you on your trip. You should be able to pack it in your checked baggage without difficulty but a note from your doctor stating that the equipment is medically necessary may help get you through airport security. Read more...
Not at all. Sure, you have a hard time sharing a room if you snore. However, treatment of sleep apnea is easy and effective. Surgery and dental appliance don't affect traveling. The CPAP maschines are small, quite and can be taken through tsa without problems. There are even battery packs and car charger for CPAP units if you like to camp. Read more...
No! If you will be without electricity, make sure you buy or rent a battery that will last the duration of your vacation. If you will be traveling internationally, make sure your pap machine can adapt to different voltages, or buy an adaptor. Lastly, if you will be going on a cruise or somewhere is questionable water quality, request distilled bottled water to be available for your humidifier. Read more...
Absolutely Not. There is no reason sleep apnea should prevent your vacation. If you're on CPAP therapy, make sure you take it with you and all accessories for it. You can travel with the equipment and take in on a plane. Since it's a medical device, it doesn't count towards your carry-on or personal item. Enjoy yourself! Read more...

Hi, I have obstructive sleep apnea, is there any risk factors having surgery (going under general anaesthetic)?

You just said it. The risks of surgery and the risk of flying in an aircraft are very similar in terms the most critical periods of time. Going under and coming back is the time when most complications occur in surgery. Taking off and landing are the most dangerous periods when flying. Make sure your surgeon AND anesthesiologist are clearly aware of any ALLERGIES or respiratory problems you may have. Good luck. Read more...
As the comment. States, it's not a problem during the general anesthetic, the anesthesiologist will be monitoring you and can easily deal with any problems. But after the surgery if taking narcotic pain meds or sedation your sleep apnea will get worse and you will not be monitored as carefully. Suggest having respiratory therapy evaluate for CPAP or continue CPAP you might be using at home. Read more...
Yes. Having OSA can put you at a higher risk of respiratory complications during surgery. It is important to let your anesthesiologist know that you have OSA so that they will take the appropriate precautions to monitor you during surgery and may arrange for therapy in the PACU. Read more...
Yes. Ask. Of course. Many different types of surgery so many types of risks. Go over in detail with surgeon. Read more...

What is obstructive sleep apnea?

OSA. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when breathing stops (apnea) during sleep usually as a result of a temporary obstruction such as a narrowing and closing in the oropharynx. When the brain detects that breathing has stopped, an alarm goes up that wakes the person so that he starts breathing again. Often the person does not know why he has woken. An observer may note snoring or gasping in the night. Read more...
Apnea. There are two types of apnea; central in whiich the brain tells the body it does not need to breath and obstructive in which the upper airway collapses due to a lose of muscle tone. Read more...
Sleep apnea. There are two kinds: central and obstructive most common is obstructive. The airway has to be evaluated. The problem can be anywhere from the nares, nasal valves, septum, uvula, large tongue, tonsils, mandibular deficiency. Read more...
A few thoughts. The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea. This type of apnea occurs when either your throat muscles intermittently relax and block your airway during sleep or you have structural narrowing of the airway. A noticeable sign of obstructive sleep apnea is snoring. Good discussion here: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/obstructive-sleep-apnea/home/ovc-20205684. Read more...

Is obstructive sleep apnea painful?

Silent killer. Sleep apnea is significantly under diagnosed and is life-threatening if not recognized and treated. It is not painful but leads to weight gain, fatigue, headaches, irritability, hypertension, and cardiac arrhythmia (among many other symptoms). It can be treated many different ways. The best is positive pressure devices coupled with weight loss. Surgery and dental devices are also an option. Read more...
No but. Although sleep apnea doesnt cause pain in itsself, one of the most common presenting sign is recurring morning headaches. Read more...
No. No. But many problems ensue. Read about it here: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/obstructive-sleep-apnea/home/ovc-20205684. Read more...

How can I treat obstructive sleep apnea?

CPAP. The treatment involves sleeping with a pressurized mask called cpap. In sleep apnea, excessive soft tissue in the throat, can relax during deep sleep, this blocks the airway and drops oxygen levels , disrupting sleep and causing other problems. A mask hooked to a machine that applies a low level of air pressure keeps the airway open. Many with osa are overweight and weight loss also helps much. Read more...
MAD device. Mandibular advancement devices, or mads, can be used as an alternative to or in combination with cpap. They are made by specially trained dentist who work in a team approach with sleep, mds. By holding the jaw forward, it opens the posterior pharyngeal airway and holds the base of the tongue forward, too. Read more...
Treat or cure. You can treat sleep apnea with a CPAP or BiPAP mask worn at night. If you're overweight, you can actually cure sleep apnea with weight loss; then you wouldn't need the mask. Read more...
Sleep MD. Work with a sleep MD. Sleep studies first. Weight loss will help. Most common modalities of treatment are CPAP, mandibular advancement devices, and surgery if other methods not satisfactory. Read more...

Can you die from obstructive sleep apnea?

Indirectly. Untreated sleep apnea causes drops in oxygen levels during sleep, this causes a release of catecholamines which are of "stress hormones". Over time this can increase the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and pulmonary hypertension. Overtime these can lead to death. In addition the sleep deprivation leads to increase car accidents, which can be fatal. Treatment helps avoid this. Read more...
Yes. Severe osa can kill. If encounter illness, require more gas exchange to maintain oxygen and acid-base balance. If unable to meet this demand, carbon dioxide builds up and, at high levels, is an anesthetic. If not intervened, will die rapidly. I intubate people literally on death's door from osa daily. Same can happen with even low doses of narcotics with osa. Read more...

How do I eliminate an obstructive sleep apnea?

Consultation. You should speak to your physician for a referral to a specialist who can properly evaluate you and discuss treatment options. Read more...
Sleep apnea. You should first be evaluated and have sleep studies. The specialist will check your nasal and oral airway for obstruction. CPAP is the first route. If fails then surgical intervention will be needed to correct the problem. Read more...
Hard to say. First off, make sure you have a proper sleep study done to determine the cause and severity of your osa. Mild to moderate sleep apneas can be treated with either an oral appliance or the nightly use of a CPAP machine. For severe sleep apnea, CPAP is the first choice. If you cannot tolerate the cpap, consider an oral appliance, a combination of appliance and cpap, and/or potentially surgery. Read more...
Evaluation First. First seek evaluation by a sleep doctor. Once the etiological factors and degree of obstruction is determined - a treatment plan can be outlined. Read more...

Do a lot of people get obstructive sleep apnea?

Yes. About 1-5% of us population has sleep apnea and the trend is increasing with increase weight gain in last 1-2 decade. Neck size greater than 17 inch in male and 16 inch in females with history of snoring, sleep symptoms like fatigue, daytime sleepiness, and high blood pressure are some of the screening sign/symptoms one may want to consider for evaluation of sleep apnea. Read more...
Yes. It has been published that 2% of women and 4% of men. But in my experience, i believe it is much higher. Read more...
Many more. Many more than you would think. Read this for details: http://healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/sleep-apnea/living-with-osa/health-consequences. Read more...

How does obstructive sleep apnea impact health?

Lots of ways. The impact of sleep disorders is evident in a wide range of adverse health consequences, including but not limited to hypertension, cadiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders such a diabetes, gastric disorders such as gerd, respiratory disorders such as asthma, emotional and psychological disorders, and even sudden death. There is a much higher rate of motor vehicle accidents as well. Read more...
Many . Sleep apnea is a serious sleep disorder that occurs when a persons breathing is interrupted during sleep. If left untreated, sleep apnea can result in a number of health problems, including: high blood pressure stroke heart failure, irregular heart beats, and heart attacks diabetes depression worsening of adhd sleep apnea may also affect everyday activities. Read more...
Read this. Well covered here: http://healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/sleep-apnea/living-with-osa/health-consequences. Read more...