What medications are available to treat urinary incontinence?

Many. For urge incontinence, medications known as anticholinergics are (pills, skin patch or skin gel)are used. Botox (injected into the bladder) is newly fda approved to treat neurogenic urge incontinence (off -label for other urge incontinence). A type of antidepressant known as tricyclic can help urge incontinence. Duloxtine, an antidepressant, can improve symptoms of stress incontinence.
Plenty. Their names are...Oxybutinin, detrol, vesicare, (solifenacin) enablex, uroxatral but many other like antihistamines and vasoconstrictors, antidepressants etc, . Consider that urinary incontinence is frustrating and needs an urologic or gyneo-urologic evaluation to consider other options.
Take Rx @ Bedtime. If you have overactive bladder try taking your medication (bladder muscle relaxant) at bedtime to reduce dry mouth side effect. Give new prescription at least 3 weeks to evaluate benefits, which continue to improve by 3 months. Also learn bladder drill exercises to reprogram your bladder: when urge strikes, stop, quickly do 5 kegel squeeze & releases, and finish with deep breath. Did urge pass?
Urodynamics. We do a urodynamic test on all women reporting urinary incontinence that is bothersome. Frequently there is anatomic problems from childbearing that are mixed with bladder muscle spasm as the cause. The anatomy can be fixed, yet muscle problems may remain. They respond to physical therapy, neocontrol treatment. Medications can help but only treat symptoms rather than fixing the problem.
TheraPy. Pelvic and continence wellness therapy is also a great option with or without meds.
Multipollen extract. Multipollen extract if taken at night relaxes bladder completely so there is no incontinence try this first for 6 weeks if no relief go on prescription meds.

Related Questions

What do I do about my urinary incontinence? Is it treatable?

Yes. Depending on the type of incontinence you have there are many options for treatment. Follow up with a urologist, or urogynecologist www.voicesforpfd.prg www.aua.org. Read more...

Is there anything aside from medications that I can use to treat urinary incontinence?

Many options. Medications are a typical treatment for urge incontinence. Other options for urge incontinence are neuromodulation: ptns is a nerve stim appplied weekly at the ankle, or interstim, an implant at the lower back. Botox injected into the bladder is indicated for certain types of urge incontinence. Stress inconitnence can respond to kegels, physical therapy or minimally invasive surgery. Read more...
Kegels & more. While we initially recommend kegel exercises to strengthen pelvic muscles that stop the flow of urine from the urethra, don't give up should they fail. If you leak with cough or exercise, you may have stress incontinence and a minimally invasive procedure called a urethral sling works wonders. If urine comes with urgency then medication may help. Most importantly, confide in your doctor. Read more...
Surgery an option. If it is stress incontinence (leakage caused by coughing, sneezing, laughing, jumping), the treatment may involve a simple outpatient surgical procedure known as a "sling" or tvt (tension-free vaginal tape) if it is . If it is urge incontinence where the patient gets a strong urge to urinate but starts leaking before reaching the bathroom, and meds have failed, a device called interstim may help. Read more...

How do you treat urinary incontinence in men?

Depends on cause. Urinary incontinence in men can result from different things. For instance, some men have leakage due to urinary retention leading to "overflow" incontience. Others may have overactive bladders causing urge incontience. Still others may have leakage results from surgery. Only a healthcare provider can help you determine what type of incontinence you have and how best to treat it. Read more...
Male incontinence. Depends on the cause. Should have a proper urologic work up to include cystoscopy and possibly urodynamics. Read more...

Can you tell me about urinary incontinence issues & actually had it treated successfully?

Here are some ... Involuntary urine leakage - urge or stress or mixed - can be reasonably managed with drugs / surgery / mental modification for most of the patients. But, there is no cure but just modification according to the detectable, available, anatomical and functional information in the patients. But, the help is not permanent because no one can stop the tissue deterioration from expected aging effects. Read more...
Urinary Incontinence. There are a few types of incontinence: stress incontinence: leaking w/ activity/coughing/ sneezing or urge incontinence: a sudden urge to got to the bathroom. Different types of incontinence are treated differently. Some can be treated with surgery and others medication.A good resource is www.voicesforpfd.org. You can also discuss further with a gynecologist/ urogynecologist/urologist. Read more...

I take an internal deodorant supplement (nullo) to treat symptoms of urinary incontinence. Is this safe, and in what doses?

Unknown safety. I did a quick research on the product. Chlorophyllin is a chemically altered chlorophyll. It has not been tested in a way that promotes a doctor to recommend it. Doses and side effects and long term effects are unknown. Finally, it has been used for rectal incontinence, not urinary incontinence. This is because it influences the gut/intestinal bacteria. Read more...

My mom is in a nursing home and has frequent urinary incontinence. What is causing this and who should I get to treat this?

Many things... Many conditions can cause urinary incontinence in patients in the nursing home environment. Actual documentation of the frequency and extent is important. Urinary tract infections, stress incontinence, medication side effects, primary neurologic disorders, or even normal pressure hydrocephalus can be causal. It may be best to have her visit (or be visited by) her primary care physician. Read more...
Bladder incont. She may be evaluated by an urologist to try determine the cause. Treatment options are not too good. Most elderly end up wearing diapers or with an inserted foley catheter. Medicines cause a lot of dryness may affect narrow angle glaucoma or worsen bladder retention. Read more...
Time to See a Doctor. There are many reasons for an elderly man or woman to have urinary incontinence. They may have stress incontinence, urge incontinence, mixed incontinence, and even overflow incontinence due to a number of age-related chnages as well as medical issues. Incontinence in the elderly may also be due to medications (e.g. Diuretics) or due to limited mobility. You doctor will do the evaluation. Read more...
Check for infection. One of the reasons elderly patients may develop acute urinary incontinence is urinary tract infection; prostate problems( in men), bladder problems( hyperactive bladder) , neurological problems, hydrocephalus ( normal pressure hydrocephalus) etc... Read more...
See below. She may be evaluated by an urologist but it is very rare to have one come to a nursing home and it is risky to take your mom out to one.  i recommend using a provider such as silvercare solutions who actually can bring a provider to your mom in the center and evaluate her bedside.  she may need a vaginal support device, an overactive bladder medicine that is not contraindicated. Read more...

Does the mesh implant to treat stress urinary incontinence resulted in complications?

For some women. Some women have experience complications with the mesh eroding through the vagina and/or the bladder. This requires repeat surgery to remove the mesh. There is a much safer, new procedure which is also good for urethral hypermobility. www.renessa.com will give you the details. It involves radiofrequency to remodel the collagen around the urethra. Read more...
Rarely. 15 years that the urethral sling is the gold standard for surgical correction of stress incontinence. In less than 10 minutes a mesh tape is inserted through a 1/2 inch incision in the roof of the vagina under the urethra to restore support to the pubic bone. Normal activity in days. Covered by insurance less than 1% serious complications. 80-90% report improvement. Imagine no more pad! Read more...
Mostly no. In most cases, no, but since every patient is different, it is difficult to predict who will have a complication. The complication rate for mesh slings is generally low (less than 10% of patients), but can sometimes require more surgery to fully correct. Read more...
Sometimes. The mesh itself is unlikely to cause problems. Problems with the slings happen when there is an erosion of the mesh material into another structure such as the bladder or the vagina. This happens less than 5% of the time. Other complications of mesh slings include bladder injury with placement, urinary retention, nerve damage, and pain. Check out the fda website for more information. Read more...
Any surgery. Any surgery has complications. Right now in the media, mesh products are getting a bad reputation. The truth is more people have been helped by these procedures than harmed. Here are some good resources www. voicesfor pfd.org www.fda.gov/medicaldevices/productsandmedicalprocedures/implantsandprosthetics/urogynsurgicalmesh. Read more...
It may. The mid urethral sling is an effective treatment for stress urinary incontinence. it is possible the sling material may cause chronic pain. This doesn't occur often but when it does it may necessitate removal of the sling material. Read more...
A urethral sling. is a thin strip of mesh that is used to support only the urethra. This particular use of mesh has been very thoroughly studied and has a low (NOT zero) risk of serious complications and a high (85-90% in most cases) success rate. If your surgeon is experienced with these devices and you have been properly evaluated, it is a reasonable recommendation. I hope this helps. Read more...