How can I treat contact dermatitis?

Avoidance & steroids. The most important issue is to avoid the item or items that you are allergic. The rash can be treated with topical steroid cream. Severe and extensive lesions may require systemic treatment with steroids under the care of a doctor.
Skin Irritants. A list of the top culprits that trigger skin reactions, or contact dermatitis. Some cause symptoms like redness, itchy skin, or inflammation.Some are triggered by an individual's allergy (contact allergic dermatitis) while other chemicals affect everyone (contact irritant dermatitis). http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/features/dirty-dozen#1.

Related Questions

How can I treat allergic contact dermatitis on my face without making it look worse?

Time & less is more. Avoid all cosmetics, and know allergens. See a dermatologist to find out what you are allergic to and what to avoid in personal products that come into contact with your skin. Use products that are hypoallergenic and very mild to moisturize and sooth the skin. Dermatologist might prescribe medications to help lessen the symptoms. Time will allow the skin to heal. Read more...

How is a child treated for contact dermatitis?

Depends. The treatment will vary on the extent and symptoms associated with the rash. Topical steroid ointments, may be used, as well as oral antihistamines, and oral steroids. Read more...

What is the best way to treat contact dermatitis?

Antihistamines and. Steroid creams...Of course it depends on the part of the body involved...Sometimes an "oatmeal" bath is soothing...Cold compresses...But see your dr. If it is getting worse. And an allergist can do patch testing to see what the cause may be...The cure of course is avoiding the trigger. See www.Truetest.Com. Read more...
Skin Irritants. A list of the top culprits that trigger skin reactions, or contact dermatitis. Some cause symptoms like redness, itchy skin, or inflammation.Some are triggered by an individual's allergy (contact allergic dermatitis) while other chemicals affect everyone (contact irritant dermatitis). http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/features/dirty-dozen#1. Read more...

Is there a gentle way to treat contact dermatitis?

Define "gentle" I'm not sure what constitutes a "gentle" treatment, but numerous topical creams, ointments, and lotions are available, as well as oral and injectable medications. Permanent cure relies on identifying the contactant that is causing the rash, which your dermatologist can do with a technique called patch testing. Read more...
Contact Dermatitis. Finding and eliminating the cause is much preferable to trreating the symptoms. Dermatologists can perform patch testing (if needed) to help identify the trigger. Read more...
Protect. Avoid things that make you break out, soaps & wetness. Wash your hands only when necessary. Wear gloves when needed. Wear clothes made of cotton. Bathe only with a small amount of mild unscented soap, such as dove. Keep the water temperature cool or warm, not hot. Use the medicine your doctor gave you. Use a plain moisturizer daily. Avoid scratching or rubbing the itchy area. Manage stress. Read more...

How do different medications treat contact dermatitis?

Reduce inflammation. Most contact dermatitis treatments are designed to reduce the inflammatory response that your body has mounted against the contactant. The rest are antihistamines, which reduce the itching. Read more...

If we treat my child's contact dermatitis will it be gone, or do I need to keep worrying?

Contact Dermatitis. U need to know what is causing the contact dermatitis in order to avoid it. Best way is through patch testing with an allergist or a dermatologist. Classic causes are nickel in cheap jewelry. Another classic example is the rash procured by poison ivy. Could be anything though, that is why finding the cause and knowing what to avoid is the best solution. Read more...
No worry, but... I would not "worry" about your child, but it would be reasonable to explore what gave him/her the dermatitis in the first place so he or she can be taught to 1) avoid it, 2) intervene early (if appropriate, such as washing off poison oak oil), and 3) treat early, if necessary. Educate and empower at as young an age as possible! Read more...