Could you die for not removing your wisdom teeth?

Only if...... People don't & can't die from not removing their wisdom teeth, whether or not they are impacted. What one can die from is any infection in your mouth (or the rest of your body) which then spreads to other parts of your body causing major complications. If a wisdom tooth becomes infected, it can for example interfere with breathing, & thus may cause death. Best to avoid risk with problem tooth.
Possible, but Rare. An infected wisdom tooth which remains in the mouth or jawbone can be a serious problem. Not only can it be very painful, but the infection can spread to neighboring areas, like the throat, the floor of the mouth, and the spaces between the muscles of your cheeks and face. Such infections often require hospitalization, surgery, high-dose antibiotics, and so on. They can be deadly. Don't wait.
Unlikely but, People have died from infections related to their wisdom teeth. Your best bet is to discuss your wisdom teeth with a dentist or oral surgeon so they can give you the risks and benefits of keeping them versus removing them.
Technically yes.... ... But not very common. You can die from almost anything, and an infection from an impacted wisdom tooth is no different. If there is a major problem with any of your wisdom teeth, remove it. You don't need them.

Related Questions

Is it possible to die for not removing wisdom teeth?

Technically yes. If any tooth is severely decayed, an abscess can develop. The bacteria can spread rapidly and enter your bloodstream, spreading to other parts of your body. Before the discovery of antibiotics, dental infections were one of the leading causes of death... That's why people extracted so many teeth. Although rare today, it is not unheard of. Read more...
Rare instances. If the wisdom tooth becomes infected and you don't receive any treatment for the infection, it could be life threatening. Read more...
Dental anesthesia. Yes, but this doesn't happen very often. Of all surgeries done every day, you only rarely see this and it's not due to removing the wisdom teeth (or the surgical expect of tooth removal). The complications that end to cause deaths just like any most other surgeries is anesthesia related (typically being from Conacious sedation and/or general anesthesia), not the local anesthetic numbing agent. Read more...
Not likely. However, not getting a problematic wisdom tooth removed can endanger your oral and overall health. See your dentist or OS ASAP. Read more...

What happens after removing your wisdom teeth?

Healing. Normally after a wisdom tooth is removed, it is usually like any other tooth extraction and a healing process occurs. A clot forms, usually bone fills in the socket and the tissue heals. The severity of the removal (impacted, partially impacted, not impacted, ) can often dictate the amount of time for healing. Follow instructions from the dentist/oral surgeon who took out the tooth/teeth. Read more...
You heal! Normally the hole in the jaw bone where a tooth is removed fills with blood. The blood clots and is re-organized into new bone and the gum tissue grows over the top and closes the would. It is a miraculous process. We often prescribe drugs for pain and swelling, and place sutures to close the gum. Your doctor will want to examine you ever few days to check healing. Read more...

Please explain which drugs do dentists use before removing your wisdom teeth?

Varies. There a number of drugs used for dental surgery. There are oral medication, nitrous oxide(laughing gas), and IV sedation drugs. It is common to use IV sedation during the removal of wisdom teeth. It gives the surgeon more control and less stressful on patient. The oral surgeon will talk to you about the options and meds used at the consultation. Read more...
A few. The oral surgeon may use antibiotics, pain medication, nitrous oxide, IV drugs to sedate. The best plan is to see an oral surgeon for exam and treatment options. Read more...

Could someone die from wisdom teeth surgery? What are the odds?

Highly unlikely. The odds of dying from having your wisdom teeth extracted are extremely small. Such deaths are very rare. The surgery is not that invasive, and you usually are not under a general anesthetic while having it done. If you need to have your wisdom teeth out, you should be fine. Read more...
Always possible.. ...But highly unlikely. Thousands of teeth are extracted daily without a problem. If it was that dangerous, there would be far more caution taken and consent necessary. Everything in life has a risk. Odds of getting struck by lightening: 1 in a million odds of pga pro hitting hole in one: 1 in 3000 odds of pba bowler rolling perfect game: 1 in 460. Read more...
So, so rare. If being treated by a skilled clinician, the chances of this happening are astronomically small. Consider this: your risk would be thousands of times more likely (millions?) of dying in a motor accident on your way to your oral surgeon than having the procedure! drive carefully. Read more...

Help! I am epeleptic and will be having all four of my wisdom teeth cut out. Is it possible death could happen?

Not to worry. Often times the medications used during intravenous sedation for wisdom teeth extraction actually are the same medications that can be used to treat active seisures. Your pcp and oral surgeon should work together to determine the safest location for the surgery to be performed. Read more...
See an oral surgeon. They can manage your case in case of emergency. Not uncommon situation. Read more...

Could impacted wisdom teeth lead to death?

Only if. They become infected and the infection travels to other parts of the body and becomes life threatening. The chances of that occurring, even though theoretically possible, is minute. That is not to say that if you have impacted wisdom teeth that require removal, you should not follow your dentist's recommendations. There are other risks of not removing them. Read more...
Absolutely . Abscess due to the wisdom tooth infection if not treated, is a serious medical condition and can eventually kill. The death from tooth abscess is not rare. Boston study (2008) found that 66 patients died due to dental abscess. . Read more...
Yes, but. Infected wisdom teeth can lead to lethal infections. Under very rare circumstances, death has occurred DURING wisdom tooth extraction. For best results, see an oral surgeon for evaluation/recommendations. Read more...

Can you fill wisdom teeth instead of removing them?

Depends. It depends on the size of the decay and its location; also depends on the structure of the wisdom tooth and the surrounding tissues. Need to assess long-term prognosis for the tooth; just because it can be filled does not mean that it should be filled or that the filling will last. Talk it over with your dentist to look at risk/benefits. Read more...
Yes. Yes, if fully erupted with no other problems. See DDS vor exact advice. If you need extraction, see oral surgeon. Read more...

How can I tell when your wisdom teeth need removing?

Ask a dentist. There are many factors leading to the ultimate decision of wisdom tooth removal. The most obvious is pain. After that, it really is a judgment call. Are the teeth able to fit in the back of the mouth without causing crowding? Can they be reached with a toothbrush and dental floss? Are the front teeth starting to crowd? To name just a few. Ask your dentist to find out. Read more...
After Evaluation. A thorough clinical examination with the appropriate x-rays allowing visualization of your wisdom teeth and jaws should be performed to determine if and when you should have wisdom teeth removed. If your wisdom teeth are the source of pain or contributing to problems of the jaws or adjacent teeth or structures, they should be removed asap. Read more...