Do I have to get some blood tests before doing a thoracic spine MRI without dye?

Typically not. Because there is no dye being used, lab tests are not usually required for the scan itself. That being said, many of the conditions that would prompt a doctor to request a thoracic MRI would also lead him or her to request lab tests as well.
Not usually. There is no need to get a blood tests for a non-contrast spine mri. However, if there is a chance that contrast might be used during the test, it's probably easier to get a simple kidney function test before having the scan, rather than having to come out, get the test and reschedule.

Related Questions

Do I have to see a specialist to get a thoracic spine MRI with dye ordered?

Spine MRI. Although your pcp can order a spine mri, but i advise you to be seen by either a neurologist of neuro surgeon inorder to be more specific, sometimes according to the symptoms may be you need to have an MRI of other part of the spine and also to have benefit of the spine MRI it is better to be reviewed carefully especially if eventually you need to be seen by the specialist. Read more...

Do I have to bring someone along, or can I drive after the thoracic spine MRI without dye?

You can drive. Without contrast , you can drive after mri. If contrast is used, it is best to bring a driver in case there are any problems (very rare). Read more...

What type of doctor can order a thoracic spine MRI with dye?

Many types. Depending on the indication, it can be ordered by neurologists, orthopedists, neurosurgeons, or many other types. As a neurologist, i usually order them looking for signs of ms. Read more...
Any. Any type of doctor can order this type of mri, however if there is a back problem it would be best to be seen by a doctor with experience in this condition (neurologist, neurosurgeon, orthopedic surgeon, physiatrist, some internists or family medicine doctors, etc) to make sure that this is the correct test. Read more...

What could be the cause of crawling sensation on scalp and body for months with normal brain and spine MRI and blood tests?

Crawling sensation. in skin. If this comes and goes the first test I would order would be an EEG. Remind your neurologist,that you are having "positive" symptoms ( eg. flashing lights , sounds, crawling sensation etc) I'm not sure why you got the MRI of the head unless your EEG confirmed a focal abnormality or MS is suspected. www.healthtap.com/drericweisman. Read more...

What can cause hip and legs pain when spine MRI blood tests neuro test good 21 male used to be very very active since aug nothing symptoms started september?

Pain at hip and lef. Some people pit wallet at back pocket which can press the nerves causing leg and hip pain also which cannot be found on mri. Read more...
Possible overuse. With the testing being negative there are no apparent major issues going on. Being very active means that you need to have an equal amount of time to recover. Have you seen your performance suffer as a result of the pain? Also, the type of exercise can put certain stresses on biomechanics- i.E- running will stress the low back, hips, knees. A running coach may be good to get in this case. Read more...

Have body pains at first shoulder and hands now mostly both legs hips constantly spine MRI clear blood tests clear when I drink a. Lot of alcohol away?

Impossible to say. Diffuse body pains in a young person can indicate many different conditions. It sounds like you are saying that when you drink a lot, your blood tests are not normal, and when you stop, they get better. If the lab tests are liver enzymes, then you are susceptible to alcohol-induced liver damage, and heavy drinking is bad for you. Fibromyalgias is a diagnosis of exclusion. See a rheumatologist. Read more...

34 y/o m waking with "shiver up spine" sensation, chest/left arm. Mri, blood tests normal. Ekg-conduction block, dr. Says not it. Help with cause?

Not sure/ck. heart. This can still point to a problem with your heart since it seems to go to your left arm. Your age is somewhat early for heart disease, but a positive family history for coronary artery disease could still mean you have to check it out. This is still nonspecific, so it could also be an early ulcer, or possibly an aneurysm in the aorta which has back pain. A full workup by your doctor would help. Read more...