Do doctors see a lot of patients with esophageal varices?

Gastrenterologists. Gastroenterologists that do hepatology, deal with cirrhosis of the liver, liver fluke, and portal hypertension.
Yes. We don't always recognize the problem however, see your primary provider to further evaluate.

Related Questions

Do a lot of people get esophageal varices?

No, it is uncommon. . Esophageal varices are more common in people with high blood pressure in veins that drain into the liver. This is usually caused by a liver disease like alcohol-induced cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis. Read more...

How do people develop esophageal varices?

Cirrhosis. When the liver becomes scarred (alcohol is the most common cause) blood can't flow through it to get back to the heart. The liver normally filters the blood coming from the GI tract. The blood still has to get back to the heart so it finds alternative pathways such as the veins in the esophagus. Over time these become swollen and can erode through the esophagus and bleed. Read more...
Cirrhosis. Scarring of the liver (cirrhosis) interferes with blood flow into the liver substance, especially venous blood coming from the gastrointestinal tract. This results in rerouting of this venous blood which is returned to the heart through esophageal varices, which are veins that become abnormally dilated in order to acommodate this increased volume of blood. Read more...

Why is esophageal varices bleeding a fatal condition?

It can be. Bleeding esophageal varices are very serious because you can loose a lot blood quickly . it can be fatal but often is not. other factors like the overall health the patient also affect the chance of death. Read more...

What are some available treatments for esophageal varices?

Multiple. Varices can be treated with medications like beta blockers to reduce venous pressures, direct ligation of the veins, systemic shunts to reduce blood flow and pressure in the liver and portal vein system. The ultimate treatment in select cases is a liver transplant. Need to work with a hematologist and GI specialist and at times a GI surgeon. Read more...