Do a lot of people get obstructive sleep apnea?

Yes. It has been published that 2% of women and 4% of men. But in my experience, i believe it is much higher.
Many more. Many more than you would think. Read this for details: http://healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/sleep-apnea/living-with-osa/health-consequences.
Yes. About 1-5% of us population has sleep apnea and the trend is increasing with increase weight gain in last 1-2 decade. Neck size greater than 17 inch in male and 16 inch in females with history of snoring, sleep symptoms like fatigue, daytime sleepiness, and high blood pressure are some of the screening sign/symptoms one may want to consider for evaluation of sleep apnea.

Related Questions

Do lots of people get obstructive sleep apnea, or is it unusual?

Lots of people do. 24% of men and 9% of women 30-60 years of age in the USA will qualify for OSA if allcomers are studied by an overnight sleep study. If only people who complain of daytime sleepiness are included, then the number drops precipitously to: 4% of men and 2% of women. Still, a pretty high prevalence, isn't it? Read more...
Much more common. Sleep apnea seems to be a lot more prevalent now due to environmental polliutants, poor nutrition, and other variables. Read more...
Obstract sleep apnea. It may affect 10% of the population, tends to occur between the ages of 40 and 60, and affects more males than females. Two-thirds of patients with OSA are overweight and fatty infiltration of the neck and tongue may also contribute to airway obstruction during sleep. Interestingly, most patients with OSA are not aware of the problem despite being exhausted on awakening. Read more...
Very common. I see it very often in my oral surgery practice. Has an impact on safely sedating orals surgery patients. Read more...

How common is it for somebody to get obstructive sleep apnea?

Very. There is a near epidemic of sleep apnea. Largely because it is strongly, associated with obesity, and there is an obesity epidemic in the United States. Read more...
Epidemic. It has become extremely common. Partly because of increased awareness. Environment, weight gain and many other factors play a role. Read more...
Much more common. Sleep apnea seems to be a lot more prevalent now due to environmental polliutants, poor nutrition, and other variables. Read more...
Very Common. There are things that can be done to help lessen symptoms of sleep apnea and depending on severity, may eliminate them. Weight loss, avoidance of sedating chemicals or medications, avoiding supine sleep can help. There is an oral device that a dentist can make and some medical therapies from an ENT that can help. Pap therapy is still the gold standard treatment and splints the airways open. Read more...

Possible obstructive sleep apnea --who do I see to get a diagnosis?

Sleep Med physician. See a board certified sleep medicine physician at a sleep disorders center accredited by the american academy of sleep medicine. Read more...
Choices. You can see an ent, sleep physician (pulmonologist), or even some primary md's. The diagnoses requires a sleep study to confirm. For treatment go to a physician who is comfortable and experienced in dealing with sleep apnea. Read more...
Sleep specialist. The standard for diagnosing sleep apnea is either a sleep test done at a sleep clinic or an overnight sleep test done at home. Information from this evidence based testing is interpreted by a board certified sleep specialist who renders a specific diagnosis from the sleep test. Dentists who provide oral appliances in treating mild and moderate sleep apnea can help arrange for sleep testing. Read more...
Sleep Specialist. Board certified sleep medicine which also might be an internist, pulmonologist, neurologist or ENT can evaluate you and order the sleep study and discuss the treatment options. Read more...

My sister says she has obstructive sleep apnea. Are family members more likely to get the same thing?

Yes. There is a strong link to obesity which has a genetic component, and there is also some increased risk to have the disease if relatively have it. Read more...
Yes. Studies are showing trends in families about sleep apnea, so your sister's diagnosis puts you at higher risk. There are lots of factors to consider, though. Genetics may play a role in muscle tone and structure of the airway. Read more...
Yes. Yes. A predisposing factor - obesity - has familial tendency. Also structural abnormalities which contribute (small jaw, nasal abnormalities) also familial. Read more...

My mom gets obstructive sleep apnea, so am I likely to get it later?

Maybe. This condition tends to occur in about 1/3 of family members. However it is related to being overweight, alcohol intake and certain physical characteristics of your upper airways. So if you resemble your mom, this would add to the possibility. Read more...
Not genetic but... ...But obesity is a major risk factor. That's what you need to avoid. Read more...
Not necessarily. You may not necessarily be predisposed to getting sleep apnea, but you should use prevention to hopefully avoid it. Exercise, eat well, keep your weight down and maintain dr. visits. Read more...

Should I get a home sleep test or an in-lab test for adult obstructive sleep apnea?

Varies case by case. A sleep-lab overnight study gathers lots of information, but is very expensive, and tests the patient outside of his normal routine. The home sleep study collects basic information, but is much cheaper, so can be done on many more people, plus it tests patients in their own beds. The decision is made case by case, but sometimes the cheaper study is done first, to see if it alone gives enough info. Read more...
Home sleep study. I agree with dr. Kwok. One more advantage of an "at-home" study is that it can be performed over several days which might help identify sleep apnea more accurately. Read more...
HST. A home sleep study is most appropriate for a person in whom sleep apnea is strongly suspected and who does my have significant medial disorders such as copd, oxygenation problems, stroke, and heart disease. It also is not appropriate if you are being assessed for symptoms that should be assessed with a video camera such as abnormal movements during sleep, sleep seizures, parasomnias, etc. Read more...
Home Sleep Study. Many insurance companies now demand a HSS vs an in-lab study. It costs a lot less and is much more comfortable and non-invasive for the patient. The HSS, though, is not as accurate. Read more...
Sleep Doc. Make sure you are evaluated by a board certified sleep doc. Follow his/her recommendations. Read more...

I have obstructive sleep apnea after gaining weight from steroids. Lately I drool a lot and sometimes foam at the mouth. Why?

See your provider. You can get a referral to a sleep specialist or perhaps your PCP can help you with all of these including ways to get the weight down. It's possible to stop the problem - then you can ask them why. Best! Read more...
See a specialist. Treating obstructive sleep apnea is a life and death decision! Sleep and oxygen deprivation can trigger severe health problems and decrease quality of life due to Obstructive Sleep Apnea. See a sleep specialist for PSG study and proper treatment. Do not procrastinate. Read more...