6 doctors weighed in:
If chronic kidney disease is so serious, why don’t I feel sick?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. Stephen Daquino
Sports Medicine
4 doctors agree
In brief: Slow Onset
Chronic kidney disease comes on slowly over a long time.
Your body is able to adjust and "get used to" the change. In acute disease, the onset is very fast, no time to adjust and you would feel very ill. Either kind can lead to kidney failure, and eventual dialysis or transplant.

In brief: Slow Onset
Chronic kidney disease comes on slowly over a long time.
Your body is able to adjust and "get used to" the change. In acute disease, the onset is very fast, no time to adjust and you would feel very ill. Either kind can lead to kidney failure, and eventual dialysis or transplant.
Dr. Stephen Daquino
Dr. Stephen Daquino
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Dr. Rajesh Boorgu
Internal Medicine - Nephrology & Dialysis
In brief: Few symptoms
Kidney failure usually will not be evident until the more advanced stages at which point patient may experience poor appetite nausea and weight loss.
Kidney failure is dangerous because it is not easily detectable. Swelling of the legs and blood in urine can also be seen in some forms. Many patients feel they can not have kidney failure because they continue to urinate but it can be present.

In brief: Few symptoms
Kidney failure usually will not be evident until the more advanced stages at which point patient may experience poor appetite nausea and weight loss.
Kidney failure is dangerous because it is not easily detectable. Swelling of the legs and blood in urine can also be seen in some forms. Many patients feel they can not have kidney failure because they continue to urinate but it can be present.
Dr. Rajesh Boorgu
Dr. Rajesh Boorgu
Thank
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