Can I die from obstructive sleep apnea if I ignore it?

Yes. If totally ignored it can be a cause of death. However, that is extremely unlikely as it is usually slowly progressive and usually forces one to see a doctor because the symptoms are so miserable.
Yes. Sleep apnea can slowly cause death. Usually there are other health issues that are associated with sleep apnea, like diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease.
Yes. There are so many options now to treat osa, please don't ignore this. If you are worried about cpap, talk to your doctor about other ways of treating sleep apnea.

Related Questions

Can you die from obstructive sleep apnea?

Indirectly. Untreated sleep apnea causes drops in oxygen levels during sleep, this causes a release of catecholamines which are of "stress hormones". Over time this can increase the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and pulmonary hypertension. Overtime these can lead to death. In addition the sleep deprivation leads to increase car accidents, which can be fatal. Treatment helps avoid this. Read more...
Yes. Severe osa can kill. If encounter illness, require more gas exchange to maintain oxygen and acid-base balance. If unable to meet this demand, carbon dioxide builds up and, at high levels, is an anesthetic. If not intervened, will die rapidly. I intubate people literally on death's door from osa daily. Same can happen with even low doses of narcotics with osa. Read more...

Can you die from obstructive sleep apnea? What causes death? Is it preventable? What test do you need to have run on you?

Obstructive . Obstructive sleep apnea is a chronic condition that is tough on your body. It happens when your airway closes off as you sleep causing disrupted sleep, snoring and fatigue and sleepiness the next day. Osa causes early mortality due to the chronic low oxygen levels at night and causes heart and lung disease and contributes to memory problems. It is diagnosed in a sleep clinic where you check in at night, sleep in their bed with monitors on your arms, legs , head and chest for the night. If you have obvious osa they will often wake you and put a CPAP device on you to see if it helps you keep your airway open on that same night. Cpap is a device that you wear under your nose or on your face like a mask and it helps put continuous airway pressure to keep your airway from closing. Folks with osa describe feeling tired all the time "like I am walking through mud". They fall asleep at the wheel driving and get high blood pressure. The diagnostic test is easy and just takes one night to help decide if this is a problem for you. Read more...
People . People with obstructive sleep apnea have an airway that is more narrow than normal, usually at the nose, back of the nose (nasopharynx), base of the tongue, back of the throat or palate. When the pharyngeal muscles (muscles of the upper throat ) relax, the palate relaxes backwards which can obstruct the airway. Most people have enough space behind the tongue to take a breath without needing to pull the tongue forward. However, when obstructive sleep apnea patients are awake, the tongue needs to be active to pull the base of the tongue forward to open the airway. During deep sleep, most muscles including the tongue muscles relax. Now, most people do not realize we don’t really need a full night sleep to be fully rested the next day. The really important part of sleep is the time we spend during deeper phases of sleep during which our bodies truly gets to relax itself. This part of our sleep may only take a few hours although in order to reach the deeper parts of our nightly sleep, we may require some superficial non relaxing type of sleep patterns. So, if you slept 8 hours one night but spent most of that sleep in a superficial type sleep, you may as well have been up watching your favorite show on tv because the next day you will be as tired. During the deep phase of sleep, also called rapid eye movement (rem) sleep, the muscles completely relax. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea often don't report actually waking up during the night with each episode of apnea. Frequently, during the apnea the brain only partially awakens from a deep sleep (stages 3, 4, or rem) to a shallow level of sleep. When the brain partially awakens to a more superficial phase of sleep, the tongue muscle contracts and pulls the tongue forward so that a breath can be taken. The patient may remain asleep, but the deep sleep that is important to be fully rested the following day is disrupted. Obstructive sleep apnea (osa) may be a risk factor for the development of other medical conditions. High blood pressure (hypertension), heart failure, heart rhythm disturbances, atherosclerotic heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, Insulin resistance, and even death are some of the known complications of untreated obstructive sleep apnea. However, to keep the range of adverse effects of sleep apnea more realistic and perhaps less dramatic, the chances of actually dying from sleep apnea is slim. It is the morbidity, the cumulative ill effect on the body that sleep apnea has which is the reason for selecting to treat it in the first place. The first evaluation of sleep apnea is by obtaining a full history of symptoms to understand the effect sleep apnea may have on various body systems. Also, your doctor can understand the source of apnea whether from direct obstruction of the airway or a problem that occurs in the central nervous system (the brain). A physical examination can reveal a lot of information beginning in the most common cause of sleep apnea which is being overweight (weight loss is directly related to reduction and prevention of sleep apnea) to various factors in the airway beginning with the nose, the nasal passageways, the back of the nose, the palate, the tonsils, the throat, and the width and thickness of the neck. Finally, to objectively assess the severity of sleep apnea, a sleep study or polysomnography is performed whereby you sleep in a room that resembles a hotel with the exception of a multitude of monitors that evaluate your heart rate, blood pressure, audio and video recording of your snoring, apneas, and body movement, recording of brain activity (electrodes), ekg (heart rhythm monitoring) and levels of oxygen in the blood. It is a painless test that is performed overnight. Diagnosis of sleep apnea may warrant treatment with weight loss, medication, a special nighttime oxygen mask (a treatment called cpap) or occasionally surgery to correct anatomical airway obstruction. Read more...
Indirectly . Death may come as a result of he sequelae of osa. Hypertension, stroke, and other cardiovascular disease have been shown to result from untreated osa. Whether you are treated with CPAP or surgery either will decrease the probability of death. Read more...
OSA sequelae. Read about it here: http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/sleep-apnea/sleep-apnea-conditions#1. Read more...

Can obesity lead to swelling in legs and feet al had echo cariagram and stress test came back ok I have severe obstructive sleep apnea if I loose we9?

Do lose weight! Losing weight will certainly help both your swelling and the sleep apnea! Will it cure both? Depends on whether or not something else is causing either or both. But both will improve with weight loss (usually!) and you will certainly be healthier if you lose weight. Go for it! (High protein-low carb diets are not the way to go for most, these are causing their own set of med. problems.) Read more...

What is obstructive sleep apnea?

OSA. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when breathing stops (apnea) during sleep usually as a result of a temporary obstruction such as a narrowing and closing in the oropharynx. When the brain detects that breathing has stopped, an alarm goes up that wakes the person so that he starts breathing again. Often the person does not know why he has woken. An observer may note snoring or gasping in the night. Read more...
Apnea. There are two types of apnea; central in whiich the brain tells the body it does not need to breath and obstructive in which the upper airway collapses due to a lose of muscle tone. Read more...
Sleep apnea. There are two kinds: central and obstructive most common is obstructive. The airway has to be evaluated. The problem can be anywhere from the nares, nasal valves, septum, uvula, large tongue, tonsils, mandibular deficiency. Read more...
A few thoughts. The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea. This type of apnea occurs when either your throat muscles intermittently relax and block your airway during sleep or you have structural narrowing of the airway. A noticeable sign of obstructive sleep apnea is snoring. Good discussion here: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/obstructive-sleep-apnea/home/ovc-20205684. Read more...

Is obstructive sleep apnea painful?

Silent killer. Sleep apnea is significantly under diagnosed and is life-threatening if not recognized and treated. It is not painful but leads to weight gain, fatigue, headaches, irritability, hypertension, and cardiac arrhythmia (among many other symptoms). It can be treated many different ways. The best is positive pressure devices coupled with weight loss. Surgery and dental devices are also an option. Read more...
No but. Although sleep apnea doesnt cause pain in itsself, one of the most common presenting sign is recurring morning headaches. Read more...
No. No. But many problems ensue. Read about it here: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/obstructive-sleep-apnea/home/ovc-20205684. Read more...

How can I treat obstructive sleep apnea?

CPAP. The treatment involves sleeping with a pressurized mask called cpap. In sleep apnea, excessive soft tissue in the throat, can relax during deep sleep, this blocks the airway and drops oxygen levels , disrupting sleep and causing other problems. A mask hooked to a machine that applies a low level of air pressure keeps the airway open. Many with osa are overweight and weight loss also helps much. Read more...
MAD device. Mandibular advancement devices, or mads, can be used as an alternative to or in combination with cpap. They are made by specially trained dentist who work in a team approach with sleep, mds. By holding the jaw forward, it opens the posterior pharyngeal airway and holds the base of the tongue forward, too. Read more...
Treat or cure. You can treat sleep apnea with a CPAP or BiPAP mask worn at night. If you're overweight, you can actually cure sleep apnea with weight loss; then you wouldn't need the mask. Read more...
Sleep MD. Work with a sleep MD. Sleep studies first. Weight loss will help. Most common modalities of treatment are CPAP, mandibular advancement devices, and surgery if other methods not satisfactory. Read more...

How do I eliminate an obstructive sleep apnea?

Consultation. You should speak to your physician for a referral to a specialist who can properly evaluate you and discuss treatment options. Read more...
Sleep apnea. You should first be evaluated and have sleep studies. The specialist will check your nasal and oral airway for obstruction. CPAP is the first route. If fails then surgical intervention will be needed to correct the problem. Read more...
Hard to say. First off, make sure you have a proper sleep study done to determine the cause and severity of your osa. Mild to moderate sleep apneas can be treated with either an oral appliance or the nightly use of a CPAP machine. For severe sleep apnea, CPAP is the first choice. If you cannot tolerate the cpap, consider an oral appliance, a combination of appliance and cpap, and/or potentially surgery. Read more...
Evaluation First. First seek evaluation by a sleep doctor. Once the etiological factors and degree of obstruction is determined - a treatment plan can be outlined. Read more...

Do a lot of people get obstructive sleep apnea?

Yes. About 1-5% of us population has sleep apnea and the trend is increasing with increase weight gain in last 1-2 decade. Neck size greater than 17 inch in male and 16 inch in females with history of snoring, sleep symptoms like fatigue, daytime sleepiness, and high blood pressure are some of the screening sign/symptoms one may want to consider for evaluation of sleep apnea. Read more...
Yes. It has been published that 2% of women and 4% of men. But in my experience, i believe it is much higher. Read more...
Many more. Many more than you would think. Read this for details: http://healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/sleep-apnea/living-with-osa/health-consequences. Read more...

How does obstructive sleep apnea impact health?

Lots of ways. The impact of sleep disorders is evident in a wide range of adverse health consequences, including but not limited to hypertension, cadiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders such a diabetes, gastric disorders such as gerd, respiratory disorders such as asthma, emotional and psychological disorders, and even sudden death. There is a much higher rate of motor vehicle accidents as well. Read more...
Many . Sleep apnea is a serious sleep disorder that occurs when a persons breathing is interrupted during sleep. If left untreated, sleep apnea can result in a number of health problems, including: high blood pressure stroke heart failure, irregular heart beats, and heart attacks diabetes depression worsening of adhd sleep apnea may also affect everyday activities. Read more...
Read this. Well covered here: http://healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/sleep-apnea/living-with-osa/health-consequences. Read more...