3 doctors weighed in:

When will my child understand rules and discipline?

3 doctors weighed in
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Up to you.

The concept of "no" comes into a child's head when whatever they want to do, that the parent says "no" to, becomes physically impossible to do.
Holding your child gently but firmly while saying "no" will get the message through the quickest.

In brief: Up to you.

The concept of "no" comes into a child's head when whatever they want to do, that the parent says "no" to, becomes physically impossible to do.
Holding your child gently but firmly while saying "no" will get the message through the quickest.
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
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Dr. Johanna Fricke
Pediatrics - Developmental & Behavioral

In brief: Learned behavior

Starts at 6 mos., when babies are smarter than puppy dogs.
Use a low, firm, "no" & redirect baby consistently. Neurotypical babies & toddlers understand ~ 100 x more than they say, & they say 3 words at a year. Discipline is teaching, not punishment. A 16 mo. Old will do what you do, not do what you say. At 18 mos. You can use time-out. Effectively. See " little people" by ed christopherson.

In brief: Learned behavior

Starts at 6 mos., when babies are smarter than puppy dogs.
Use a low, firm, "no" & redirect baby consistently. Neurotypical babies & toddlers understand ~ 100 x more than they say, & they say 3 words at a year. Discipline is teaching, not punishment. A 16 mo. Old will do what you do, not do what you say. At 18 mos. You can use time-out. Effectively. See " little people" by ed christopherson.
Dr. Johanna Fricke
Dr. Johanna Fricke
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Dr. Roy Benaroch
Pediatrics

In brief: Depends on rules

For younger children especially, rules need to be firm and easy-to-understand, and always enforced if you expect to teach it.
A good rule: "no hitting" (you know exactly when that rule is broken, and can enforce it.) a vague, hard to enforce rule like "don't squirm at the table" is going to be difficult to define and enforce, so it won't work on a young child.

In brief: Depends on rules

For younger children especially, rules need to be firm and easy-to-understand, and always enforced if you expect to teach it.
A good rule: "no hitting" (you know exactly when that rule is broken, and can enforce it.) a vague, hard to enforce rule like "don't squirm at the table" is going to be difficult to define and enforce, so it won't work on a young child.
Dr. Roy Benaroch
Dr. Roy Benaroch
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