4 doctors weighed in:
Rules of malignancy for pvcs? Do these apply to people with normal hearts?
4 doctors weighed in

Dr. Bennett Werner
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Yes and No
The ticklish part is determining "normal" as that depends on the sophistication of the tests.
Pvcs resulting in loss of consciousness are not benign. Pvcs causing just palpitations with a normal echo, ekg, and no evidence of coronary disease or other significant structural abnormality are benign. General rule: the health of the heart, not the # of pvcs determines benignity. Family hx counts too.

In brief: Yes and No
The ticklish part is determining "normal" as that depends on the sophistication of the tests.
Pvcs resulting in loss of consciousness are not benign. Pvcs causing just palpitations with a normal echo, ekg, and no evidence of coronary disease or other significant structural abnormality are benign. General rule: the health of the heart, not the # of pvcs determines benignity. Family hx counts too.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Dr. Bennett Werner
Thank
5 comments
Dr. Bennett Werner
A cardiac MRI will rule out rare serious entities like myocardial fibrosis, atypical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmogenic RV dysplasia. Depending on your age and risk factors, a coronary angiogram should be considered independently of stress test results. This is bread & butter for EPs - I'm glad you're seeing one! If you don't feel good, treatment is indicated regardless.
Dr. Bennett Werner
If you don't have a family history of sudden, unexpected death, other things being equal, that's good too. The opposite is also true (bad family hx means you need a closer look).
Dr. Liviu Klein
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
2 doctors agree
In brief: It depends
It depends on a variety of factors such as your heart (structure, function, ejection fraction, presence/ absence of coronary disease) and pvcs (singlets, couplets, runs of ventricular tachycardia, coupling interval - how fast they occur after a normal beat, frequency in 24 hours).
An electrophysiologist (ep doctor) is best suited to deal with these.

In brief: It depends
It depends on a variety of factors such as your heart (structure, function, ejection fraction, presence/ absence of coronary disease) and pvcs (singlets, couplets, runs of ventricular tachycardia, coupling interval - how fast they occur after a normal beat, frequency in 24 hours).
An electrophysiologist (ep doctor) is best suited to deal with these.
Dr. Liviu Klein
Dr. Liviu Klein
Thank
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