How can I reduce the swelling from corneal abrasion?

Prevent infection . Best to follow the instruction of your eye care doctor with eye drops, many times this is all that is needed for the cornea to heal and return to normal. The cornea can heal with time, occasionally drops are needed.

Related Questions

Poked in eye, went to ER, found corneal abrasion, but have superior rectus palsy and ptosis, upper eyelid swelling, what could this be?

Let the swelling go. Down first, then see what you look like after following up at the eye doctor. Your poked eye has been traumatized, and your cornea should be healing now. Have your eye doctor make the final diagnosis, not the ER. They are helping you get thru this, and may have mentioned things in their differential diagnosis to help you understand better other eye/ eyelid problems. Read more...
Orbital injury. Something is going on in the superior orbit. Hematoma, foreign body, infection. The orbit needs imaging to see why the levator and superior rectus are not working properly . Read more...

Is it normal to have retinal swelling and corneal abrasion after cataract surgery? I'm 54 had lasik in left eye 3/30/05 no problems good results. Had cataract surgery on 4/21/11 vision 20/200 swelling retina 350 micron with wrinkles and severe corneal abr

The . The cornea should heal completely in several days. The retinal wrinkles may represent chronic cystoid edema. Possible preretinal membrane. Often an intraocular injection of steroid is needed. See a university based retinal specialist. Read more...
The . The use of a hard contact lens should compensate for any corneal irregularity. Therefore, your decreased vision may be due to macular edema (retinal swelling). A macular thickness of 320 microns is greater than the normal macular thickeness of ~200 microns. Additional treatment options may include intravitreal steroid injection or macular laser. Discuss further treatment options with your ophthalmologist. A referral to a retina specialist may be also valuable, if not already considered. Read more...
Uncommon. Macular edema and corneal abrasion are uncommon after cataract surgery and require additional therapy. See your eye surgeon. Read more...
Not typical. Corneal abrasion is unusual but can occur and usually heals within a few days. Macular edema is more serious and is treated with nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory drops. Macular pucker or epiretinal membranes can predispose to cystoid macular edema. Retinal examination prior to cataract surgery can identify eyes at risk unless the density of the cataract prevents an adequate retinal examination. Read more...
Perhaps. Corneal abrasion at the time of cataract surgery can happen, but it is very rare. Certain conditions can increase the incidence (dry eyes, blepharitis, even previous lasik). The retinal swelling also is somewhat rare to the level you are describing, but it too still happens. Conditions like diabetes, uveitis history, and pre-existing wrinkling of the retina (epiretinal membrane) increase risk. Read more...

What can cause a corneal abrasion?

Usually injury. The most common cause for corneal abrasion is trauma, usually something striking the front surface of the eye like a fingernail, hairbrush, or tree branch. Other causes include corneal dystrophies, severe dry eye, eye surgery, contact lens removal, and many others. Most can be treated with drops to help the pain and prevent infection, although bandage contact lenses or patching may be required. Read more...

How do I know if I have a corneal abrasion?

Pain. Corneal abrasion, a loss of the cellular skin covering the cornea at some point, is intensely painful causing striking redness, and light sensitivity. Most who have one don't question the diagnosis but cry out for help. See your ophthalmolgist right away if you suspect this condition. Read more...

What sort of disorder is a corneal abrasion?

Abrasion of cornea. The cornea, the front window of the eye, is covered by a thin epithelium. When this is disturbed, usually by an object scraping it off such as a hairbrush bristle, or any object entering the front of the eye, an abrasion occurs. These are painful, cause the eye to get quite red, and usually disturb the vision. See your ophthalmologist as soon as possible for diagnosis and relief. Read more...
K abrasion. This is an injury of the surface layer of the cornea called the epithelium as a result of a cut or scratch. This may be secondary to a fingernail, paper cut, tree branch, etc. Read more...

How can I tell if I have a corneal abrasion?

Pain. Corneal abrasion, a loss of the cellular skin covering the cornea at some point, is intensely painful causing striking redness, and light sensitivity. Most who have one don't question the diagnosis but cry out for help. See your ophthalmolgist right away if you suspect this condition. Read more...

I may have a corneal abrasion. How can I tell?

Hurts. This is a loss of the protective skin covering the cornea. The cornea is well endowed with pain fibers and an abrasion will hurt significantly. If the history suggests an abrasion (i just scraped my eye; the edge of a paper hit my eye; a tree branch swung into my eye, etc.), and the eye hurts an abrasion is likely. See an er doctor or an ophthalmologist for treatment. Read more...