11 doctors weighed in:

I have unquenchable thirst.?

11 doctors weighed in
Dr. Matt Malkin
Anesthesiology
8 doctors agree

In brief: Get checked ASAP

First test will look for diabetes mellitus, in blood and urine, as this is how very high sugars look.
May also have diabetes insipidus, another hormone imbalance. A chemistry panel and urinalysis are definitely good starting points. I'd at least go to urgent care for this, if not the er, unless you get same day appointment with your doc. Can have very bad electrolyte imbalances.

In brief: Get checked ASAP

First test will look for diabetes mellitus, in blood and urine, as this is how very high sugars look.
May also have diabetes insipidus, another hormone imbalance. A chemistry panel and urinalysis are definitely good starting points. I'd at least go to urgent care for this, if not the er, unless you get same day appointment with your doc. Can have very bad electrolyte imbalances.
Dr. Matt Malkin
Dr. Matt Malkin
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3 comments
Dr. Matt Malkin
Hope it all works out. Even if is diabetes, most important part is diagnosis. Not sure how old he is, but I've been amazed at how well even young children do managing their insulin. Just intelligent, resilient little guys who seem to make the best of a situation.
Dr. Hallie Robbins
Mary Tylee Moore is one long-lived diabetic. Good for you and your family to seek help figuring out what your son might have. Be well.
Cole Livingston
Emergency Medicine
8 doctors agree

In brief: See a doctor.

Insatiable thirst even after drinking copious amounts of water generally means there is a chemical imbalance in the blood.
Most commonly, this occurs in people who are diabetic and do not yet know they have the disease. Often when a person is first diagnosed, they will report constant thirst as well as fatigue, malaise, change in appetite, and frequent urination, all due to high blood sugar.

In brief: See a doctor.

Insatiable thirst even after drinking copious amounts of water generally means there is a chemical imbalance in the blood.
Most commonly, this occurs in people who are diabetic and do not yet know they have the disease. Often when a person is first diagnosed, they will report constant thirst as well as fatigue, malaise, change in appetite, and frequent urination, all due to high blood sugar.
Cole Livingston
Cole Livingston
Answer assisted by Cole Livingston, Medical Student
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1 comment
Dr. Larry Armstrong
Another possibility overlooked could be diabetes insipidus- a malfunction of pituitary secretion. It is not related to diabetes despite the name. If your workup doesn't show much, keep this possiblity in mind for your doctor. Good luck.
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