5 doctors weighed in:
I was told I got a PFO what is it and when does it have to get closed or does it have to be closed. And is it bad what will the heart doctor do?
5 doctors weighed in

Dr. Joseph Moore
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Hole in the heart
Pfo (patent foramen ovale) is a persistent hole in the wall that divides the upper chambers (atria) of the heart.
Everyone has one when born but the hole stays open in about 25% of people. It only needs to be fixed (with a closure device inserted through a catheter in the vein) if there is evidence of clot(s) crossing from the r to l atrium (patients with TIA or stroke and a pfo).

In brief: Hole in the heart
Pfo (patent foramen ovale) is a persistent hole in the wall that divides the upper chambers (atria) of the heart.
Everyone has one when born but the hole stays open in about 25% of people. It only needs to be fixed (with a closure device inserted through a catheter in the vein) if there is evidence of clot(s) crossing from the r to l atrium (patients with TIA or stroke and a pfo).
Dr. Joseph Moore
Dr. Joseph Moore
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1 comment
Dr. Joshua Liberman
The bottom line: 1 out of every 4 people on the planet has a PFO. For the vast majority of them, it never leads to anything at all. Whether or not they are related to serious medical problems is still a little controversial
Dr. Hesham Hassaballa
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care
In brief: Small hole in heart
A PFO is a "patent foramen ovale.
" it is a hole that remained open in your heart when it should have closed after birth. Many times, it is harmless, but sometimes, it can cause serious heart and breathing problems. That should be looked at in detail, and one way can be with a test called a "bubble echo." i would see a heart specialist.

In brief: Small hole in heart
A PFO is a "patent foramen ovale.
" it is a hole that remained open in your heart when it should have closed after birth. Many times, it is harmless, but sometimes, it can cause serious heart and breathing problems. That should be looked at in detail, and one way can be with a test called a "bubble echo." i would see a heart specialist.
Dr. Hesham Hassaballa
Dr. Hesham Hassaballa
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