Can blood in the urine cause a false positive for protein in the urine?

Yes. Because the hemoglobin in red blood cells is a protein, if there is blood in the urine it can test positive for protein. You would need to have your urine retested when there is no blood in it to make sure about the protein.

Related Questions

Protein and blood in urine. What is the cause? For well over a year.

Kidney problem. There are many type of kidney disease that can give you positive blood and increased protein in the urine- from infection, inflammation, autoimmune problems, injury to kidney due to different factors, medication related, other medical condition etc. Since that has been going on for over a year- do not delay further- you should see a kidney doctor and have further evaluation. Read more...

Could 1+ blood in Urine be due to a period that was still there but very light? In turn could this have caused 1+ protein? My doc not worried. I am

Doctor is right... I do agree to Doc's opinion at this time, but it is advisable to just keep eyes on it with repeating UA + creatinine once or twice yearly for next 2-3 yrs so to check how it may evolve. Of course, always use a properly collected fresh urine for testing because of high odd to have contamination, especially in overweight females. To do right, go to http://formefirst.com/hematuria.html. Best wish... Read more...

Have lupus. Have had persistent moderate blood in urine (no RBC) for yrs with no known cause. Now have microscopic hematuria (+2-5), with trace protein?

LUPUS. It certainly sounds like prompt follow-up with one of your doctors would be in order; preferably your rheumatologist. If that follow up appointment is going to be delayed, then make an appointment with your primary care Doctor Who can initiate some further testing and evaluation. Read more...

Could an untreated UTI lead to something worse? Tested positive for trace protein/blood in urine. Urine odor, odd sensation after urination.

Yes. An untreated UTI can lead to increasingly bothersome symptoms (urgency, frequency, pain, incontinence, and visible blood) or, potentially more serious, a kidney infection (pyelonephritis) with fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, flank pain and risk of sepsis requiring hospitalization and IV antibiotics. Best to get evaluated and treated if symptoms bothersome, persist, or worsen. Read more...