13 doctors weighed in:
Why is it necessary to do a mammogram?
13 doctors weighed in

Dr. Karen Glover
Family Medicine
8 doctors agree
In brief: Mammogram
It is not necessary to get a mammogram.
A mammogram is a screening test for breast cancer and considered preventive medicine. 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer, including those with strong family history of (maternal side) breast cancer. Since finding breast cancer in the early stages increases the cure rate, it is to a woman's advantage to get screened.

In brief: Mammogram
It is not necessary to get a mammogram.
A mammogram is a screening test for breast cancer and considered preventive medicine. 1 in 8 women will get breast cancer, including those with strong family history of (maternal side) breast cancer. Since finding breast cancer in the early stages increases the cure rate, it is to a woman's advantage to get screened.
Dr. Karen Glover
Dr. Karen Glover
Thank
2 comments
Dr. Kathryn Wagner
It is not "necessary" but advised if over age 40. The idea is to catch the cancer when it shows up inits earliest stages BEFORE it's big enough to be felt by you or your doctor. Mass screening mammogram programs are responsible for the earlier stage at diagnosis and partly for the better survival rates over the past couple of decades.
Dr. Barry Rosen
Surgery
2 doctors agree
In brief: They Save Lives!
It is well-established that yearly mammograms (beginning at age 40) will find cancers at an earlier stage than by physical examination alone.
This translates into smaller operations, less need for chemotherapy, and, ultimately, saved lives. Despite these facts, less than half of all eligible women comply with this recommendation. What can our profession do to increase this?

In brief: They Save Lives!
It is well-established that yearly mammograms (beginning at age 40) will find cancers at an earlier stage than by physical examination alone.
This translates into smaller operations, less need for chemotherapy, and, ultimately, saved lives. Despite these facts, less than half of all eligible women comply with this recommendation. What can our profession do to increase this?
Dr. Barry Rosen
Dr. Barry Rosen
Thank
Dr. Eric Wang
Radiology
2 doctors agree
In brief: IT CAN FIND CANCER!
Breast cancer will affect 1 in 8 women! the american college or radiology recommends yearly screening mammograms begin at age 40 or 10 years earlier than the diagnosis of a primary relative (sister/mother).
In addition, because not all cancers can be seen on mammogram, women should do monthly self-exams, as well as periodic exams by a breast health professional.

In brief: IT CAN FIND CANCER!
Breast cancer will affect 1 in 8 women! the american college or radiology recommends yearly screening mammograms begin at age 40 or 10 years earlier than the diagnosis of a primary relative (sister/mother).
In addition, because not all cancers can be seen on mammogram, women should do monthly self-exams, as well as periodic exams by a breast health professional.
Dr. Eric Wang
Dr. Eric Wang
Thank
Dr. Michael Gabor
Diagnostic Radiology
In brief: Mammograms
Screening mammography is performed to detect early breast cancers, when they are potentially most curable.
Mammography screening programs have been shown to reduce breast cancer mortality. Most organizations recommend starting screening at age 40.

In brief: Mammograms
Screening mammography is performed to detect early breast cancers, when they are potentially most curable.
Mammography screening programs have been shown to reduce breast cancer mortality. Most organizations recommend starting screening at age 40.
Dr. Michael Gabor
Dr. Michael Gabor
Thank
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