5 doctors weighed in:

Dimple gone after upper teeth extraction. Is this normal?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Louis Gallia
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Temporary

Temporary. Swelling.
Should return shortly.

In brief: Temporary

Temporary. Swelling.
Should return shortly.
Dr. Louis Gallia
Dr. Louis Gallia
Thank
Dr. Gary Sandler
Dentistry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: IDK

Most cheek dimples are the result of a shortened zygomaticus major muscle of the face which pulls hard enough on your cheeks to cause visible indentations on your face.
The loss of the dimple might be due to swelling, stretching of the muscle or a mere coincidence as some people lose their dimples with age. Wait it out and see if it returns.

In brief: IDK

Most cheek dimples are the result of a shortened zygomaticus major muscle of the face which pulls hard enough on your cheeks to cause visible indentations on your face.
The loss of the dimple might be due to swelling, stretching of the muscle or a mere coincidence as some people lose their dimples with age. Wait it out and see if it returns.
Dr. Gary Sandler
Dr. Gary Sandler
Thank
Dr. Diane Stacey
Dentistry

In brief: Dimple

Your teeth provide support for the soft tissues for your face.
If you loose back teeth your cheeks will automatically dip in where the teeth are gone. Also, as you decrease the number of back teeth your facial muscles become more lax and tend to droop. A dimple is created by toned muscles with the proper "support" by bones and teeth.

In brief: Dimple

Your teeth provide support for the soft tissues for your face.
If you loose back teeth your cheeks will automatically dip in where the teeth are gone. Also, as you decrease the number of back teeth your facial muscles become more lax and tend to droop. A dimple is created by toned muscles with the proper "support" by bones and teeth.
Dr. Diane Stacey
Dr. Diane Stacey
Thank
Dr. Gary Klugman
Dentistry

In brief: Not really

Not normal. Swelling might be affecting it.
Another possibility is a change in the height of your teeth ie. The distance from your chin to your nose. It is what we call the vertical height.

In brief: Not really

Not normal. Swelling might be affecting it.
Another possibility is a change in the height of your teeth ie. The distance from your chin to your nose. It is what we call the vertical height.
Dr. Gary Klugman
Dr. Gary Klugman
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. William Forsythe
Board Certified,
23 years in practice
171K people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors