Breast cancer chemotherapy in hepatitis b patients?

Challenging . Appropriate involvement of hepatologist and treatment (or prophylaxis) of hep b is imperative.
Very Complicated. I am not sure we can offer much here. The various chemotherapy regimens are not noted here; nor is the hepatitis status and what treatment you are on if you have active hepatitis b or are inactive. I would believe that you should be able to have full treatment regardless, especially if your hepatitis b is being treated appropriately.

Related Questions

How long should a patient wait before starting chemotherapy and after the breast cancer surgery?

No magic number. The best answer is "as soon as possible", since there is no benefit to waiting (other than allowing a few weeks to recover from surgery). Many clinical trials require that chemotherapy be started within 6 weeks of surgery, but this, too, is arbitrary. I suggest that you talk to your medical oncologist and ask him/her what is best for you. Read more...
8-12 weeks. It depends on the type of breast cancer, but for most breast cancers, studies show that chemotherapy should be started by 12 weeks after surgery. After 12 weeks, the benefit from chemo starts to drop off. If your cancer is more aggressive (triple negative, er negative) you should probably start sooner, ie within 4-6 weeks. Read more...
Depends. In general chemotherapy is started 4 weeks after surgery, ofcourse if surgical wound is well healed and there are no signs of infection. Again, in general no longer than 8 weeks. Each case is different, talk to your oncologist. Read more...
12 weeks. Studies have shown that benefit from chemotherapy doesn't begin to drop off as long as it is started within 12 weeks of surgery. I take the type of cancer into consideration, though. For more aggressive breast cancers, i like to start chemo within 4-6 weeks. For the slower growing er+ cancers, within 12 weeks is fine and supported by data. Read more...

If a breast cancer patient undergoes neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, how will she ever know her true nodal status?

Sentinel LN Biopsy. It is somewhat controversial when to perform sentinel lymph node (ln) biopsy in this setting: some advocate performing this prior to chemo, so as to determine an accurate stage; others believe that the status of the ln after chemo is most pertinent. In my practice, i will perform a needle-biopsy of any abnormal ln prior to chemo. If none are evident, i wait until after chemo. Read more...
She won't. I used to always ask surgeons to do a sentinel node biopsy before neoadjuvant chemotherapy for that very reason. However, newer data show the lymph node status after chemotherapy may be more important. Newer data also show that women don't always need a full axillary dissection with a few positive nodes, so i'm ok with either approach if the lymph nodes aren't enlarged to start. Read more...
"true" nodal status? With neoadj therapy, prognostic infor of staging after therapy is likely the more telling. Studies show slnbx after chemo still accurately predicts axillary nodal status. With current chemo, a 20-25% PCR is not unexpected and would include clearing previously pos nodes (found clinically or on prechemo ax u/s & fna). Delaying the slnbx can thus spare these patients additional axillary surgery. Read more...

What are common proven alternatives to chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment?

Alternative to what? Chemotherapy is the administration of a drug that circulates throughout the body and kills cancer cells. Our goal is to choose the most effective drug tailored to one's specific cancer subtype. If by "alternative" you mean alternative to proven, standard therapy...No. However, many of our "standard" drugs are well-tolerated w/o traditional side-effects like hair loss, nausea, etc. Read more...

Is there a less toxic alternative to chemotherapy for breast cancer treatment?

Yes. We look at each cancer's profile - estrogen / Progesterone /her-2 receptors as well as histology-size, grade , blood vessel invasioneg then the patient herself age menopause status-if recepto pos. And older pt. Ie postmenopausal we often treat with hormonal therapy - pills - that have a less severe side effect profile but still not without problems - osteoporosis uterine cancer catarats. Read more...
Hormonal Therapy. The vast majority (80-85%) of breast cancer is hormone sensitive/driven. Pathology testing can determine if a tumor is er+. Unless otherwise contraindicated, all er+ patients should be considered for hormone therapy. If strongly er+, they may get more benefit from this than from chemotherapy. Specialized testing (oncotype dx) is often used to determine if chemotherapy is still needed in er+ pt. Read more...
Potentially. Brca tx may include chemo, hormones, radiation, bone targeted tx & diet/exercise as "adjvuant" (post surgery) treatment. The combo needed depends on the tumor characteristics (grade, stage, hormone receptor status - er, pr; and her2/neu status). Non chemo tx can include hormones - eg tamoxifen, arimidex, (anastrozole) etc; trastuzumab (herceptin - anti her2 antibody). Optimal therapy may include all those. Read more...
Yes. In some cases hormonal treatment can be as effective as chemotherapy. However if there is benefit from chemotherapy then it would be in addition to hormonal therapy. You should ask what percent benefit chemotherapy would give your circumstance and then decide if it's worth it to you to not accept that benefit. Read more...

How can I fight chemotherapy induced nausea during breast cancer treatment?

Medication. Begin with basic nausea medicines such as Compazine or phenergan, (promethazine) if not improved then more expensive medications such as Zofran or others. It also helps if patients avoid smells or foods that seem to trigger the symptom. Sometimes even perfumes and non food smells may be an issue and you can avoid them if suspected. Foods like crackers, 7-up, ginger ale or ginger root can help. Read more...
Stay hydrated. Eat ginger chew gum and have your md supply you with one or more rxs & do these things before symptoms develop( you'll learn to predict). Read more...
Speak to you doc. Speak to your treating oncologist, they can prescribe different medications to help with the nausea. Read more...