Do all prolonged fevers in a mitral valve prolapsed patient mean endocarditis?

Fever. Prolonged fever needs to be evaluated. Endocarditis is one possibility for a cause.
No. There are many infectious and non infection causes of prolonged fever. Prolonged fever in a patient with an abnormal heart valve always warrants a diagnostic work up to rule out endocarditis. This includes at least multiple blood cultures and a cardiac echo preferably a trans-esophageal echo.
Usually not. Usually not, but you should have your own doctor check you.

Related Questions

Should a couple ruptured Chordae tendineae and (as a result) mitral valve prolapse from endocarditis warrant worry for a 26 y/o athlete? No symptoms.

Ruptured chordae. Generally this condition will cause mitral valve insufficiency which may increase over time. Discuss with your doctor, you may need an exercise echo test to see if mitral insufficiency is present or increases with increasing exercise. Your Dr.(cardiologist)can advise of your status with the information. Read more...

Expert Mitral Surgeon said to my Father, Surgeons usually repair a Prolapse Mitral Valve in patients that are under the age of 75. Why not over 75?

Risk vs. Benefit. For any operation, surgeons always consider the expected benefits versus the expected risks. As we age, the risks of surgery increases. It is also possible that the expected benefit can decrease as we age. For example, if the degree of valve problem is only moderate, the surgeon might expect the valve to last their expected lifetime. For a younger patient, their expected lifetime is longer. Read more...
Obviates anticoag. Mitral valve prolapse typically lends itself to repair rather than replacement because of redundant tissue. In some cases, repair is not possible. Repair means using one's own tissue and therefore obviates need for long term anticoagualation with its attendant risks of bleeding, followup etc and therefore is preferred than valve replacement in elderly patients. In good hands, repair should go well. Read more...

An Expert Mitral Valve Surgeon Explained to my Father Surgeons usually repair a Prolapse Mitral Valve in patients that are under the age of 75 Why?

Prolapse surgery. When a patient has mitral prolapse causing problems which require surgery as an intervention, the preferred approach, if possible, is mitral valve repair. Most patients with prolapse don't need surgery. Each patient has their own specific situation and decision making has to be consistent with that patient's particulars. Some patients who need the surgery aren't appropriate for repair. Read more...

I have diagnosed with mitral valve prolapse with trivial mr. Have ESR 27mm/hr. I had history of rheaumatic fever and is there any problem?

It depends. With history of rheumatic fever, it is ideal to check the nature of the mitral valve. While the mr is trivial, the echo findings can help in the evaluation for surgical intervention, aside from symptoms. The expertise of the cardiologist and cv surgeon is critical in DX and rx . Even with trivial mr, surgery maybe needed especially with atrial fibrillation hx. But, you will need to be seen again. Read more...

What does stage iia2 mean? (mitral valve prolapse)

Mitral valve prolaps. Mitral valve has anterior (a) and posteriotr leaflets (p). Prolapse has 4 stages. Stage i is mild, stage 2 is moderate, stage 3 is moderate to severe and stage 4 is severe degree. Anterior leaf let has three sections labeled as a1, a2, a3. Stage ii a2 means: a2 section shows moderate degree of prolapse. Read more...

What does it mean to have mitral valve prolapse syndrome?

Often nothing! Mitral valve prolapse, once said to be a cause of many symptoms, is often a harmless finding, esp in young individuals. When it is accompanied by significant leakage back across the vale (mitral regurgitation), it can be a serious finding. Thus, if it is just a click heard listening to the heart, don't worry. Your doctor may want to order an echocardiogram if not sure. Read more...
Loose mitral valve. Mitral valve prolapse refers to the valve between the left atrium and the left ventricle of your heart is bowing far back into the left atrium when the left ventricule squeezes and is often associated with mitral regurgitation, or blood flowing back into the left atrium from the left ventricle. Due to loose or turn chordae (muscle fibers), which normally prevent the valve from prolapsing. Read more...