How long does the upper extremity joint MRI without dye take?

20 - 45 min. Depending on your ability to lie still, the size of the MRI magnet and the computing software used, it will likely take from 20 to 45 minutes for the scan. You should allow 90 minutes total for registration, preparation, positioning and instructions.
Usually 30 min. Usually about 30 minutes, give or take a bit, is the total time needed for a non contrast MRI. The total scan time is less, but there has to be some time for positioning and quick scans for proper alignment. There are multiple short scans done, each usually taking 2 to 8 minutes a piece, depending on the scan sequence used. Addition time and scans sequences can be done and are optional.

Related Questions

Is the upper extremity joint MRI without dye a risky thing to do?

Not at all. There is almost no risk for an MRI without dye. The biggest risk would be if you brought something magnetic into the area of the machine - it could be damaged or moved, causing harm. Read more...
No. Except under a few certain circumstances, such as patients with a nerve stimulator, a pacemaker or some other other wires or cables inside the body, MRI is a very safe procedure. There is no radiation involved, and at most you may have a rise in body temperature of a degree or so in the area being scanned. Discuss possible contra-indications for MRI studies with your Doctor before you schedule. Read more...

Where is an upper extremity joint MRI without dye usually done? At a hospital?

Radiology Center. Either stand-alone-radiology center or one that is part of the hospital system...Where-ever there is an MRI machine available typically will do MRI with/out contrast... Read more...
Imaging center. Most communities have imaging centers near a hospital or medical facility. In some states MRI scanners are avaiable in a doctors office. Read more...

What kind of complications might happen from an upper extremity joint MRI with dye?

Very rare. Complications from arthrogram for MRI is rare. I do many of these and the most common side effect is simply soreness from the injection. There is a theoretical risk of kidney damage, but the amount of contrast used is so small, this is very unlikely. If the dye is given intravenously, it might slightly raise this risk. Other rare complications include bleeding and infection. Read more...
Many. There are many complications for this, mostly related to the injection of contrast. Fortunately, the number of complications is small, and pre-screening for risk factors is helpful. You can get infection at the injection site, deep vein thrombosis, embolism, septicemia and more. You can have an allergic reaction to the contrast, from mild to very severe and death, or have kidney damage. Read more...