Are you able to examine your own prostate? And my nan has had breast cancer so should I get examined?

No way. The prostate is far inside the anus. It can be hard even for a physician to examine. Don't even think of trying to examine it yourself. It would not mean anything to you even if you could reach it.
See your doctor. It is not a good idea to try to examine your own prostate, let your doctor do it. Breast caner in males is rare and you could do self examination to see if there are any lumps, nipple discharge, discoloration, edema or rash.

Related Questions

I have both prostate and breast cancer. Is it ok to take avadart for PC and Tamoxafin for BC at the same time?

Wish I could answer. but this is REALLY a question you should ask your oncologist, who hopefully is coordinating your care. Don't be afraid to ask. It is your life and a legitimate question. Assuming the same person has prescribed both, it is probably OK to take both. However, in general, medication doses should always be separated by at least an hour. Good luck! Read more...

Can you tell me about breast cancer verses prostate cancer?

Hmmm. They are cancers originating in two different organs. One is exclusive for men, the other almost always seen in women. Both may be cured if detected early and may kill if advanced. Interestingly, both types are often "fueled" by sex hormones (estrogen for breast and testosterone for prostate). Read more...

Prostate cancer vs breast cancer, which one is more dangerous?

Very similar. Breast and prostate cancers are among the most treatable cancers. The risk of ever dying of cancer with either diagnosis is about one in four. Read more...

What are the statistics regarding the prevalence of prostate cancer and breast cancer?

Associated. In the US one in 7 women at risk for breast cancer. When BRACA gene for hereditary disease not present most women will have evidence of the MMTV virus having entered the Wnt.1 gene lining mammary ducts to induce transformation. The same virus enters the prostate cells to transform them to malignancy so that men who are married to women with breast cancer have a higher incidence of prostate Ca. Read more...

What are the rates of prostate cancer and breast cancer in the U.S.?

Cancer rates. The chance of developing an invasive breast cancer during a woman's lifetime is 1 in 8. The chance of developing prostate cancer is about 1 out of every 7 men. About 80% of men over 80 years hold have prostate cancer. Read more...

What are some stats on the severity of prostate cancer and breast cancer?

The National. Cancer Institute keeps various statistics on breast, prostate, and other cancers, if that is what you are looking for. You can find the information at http://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/breast.html. Read more...

Fam history uterine/colon/prostate/breast cancer on both mom/dad sides. All diagnosed before 50. Am I at an increased risk?

May be. It would require a more detailed history about your family. It would be prudent to consult your doctor to see if you may need genetic testing and also discuss about starting cancer surveillance at an age 10 years younger than the earliest age of relevant cancer in your family. Wish you good health! For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form. Drink enough water daily so that your urine is mostly colorless. Practice safe sex. Get HPV vaccine. Read more...

If negative for brca gene, yet father had prostate cancer, is his daughter still at risk for breast cancer? I heard they were linked.

BRCA gene links. A family history of breast ovarian or colon cancer can predispose future genetic progeny if the BRCA is positive. I am unaware of a negative BRCA link to prostate cancer in males producing breast cancer in the female progeny. Read more...
Not elevated risk. In families who DO have a BRCA mutation, the breast and prostate cancers can be linked. However both are very common cancers, so they can be seen within families even if BRCA negative. The average lifetime risk of breast cancer for any given woman is 12.5%. You can do a search for the Gail Risk Model to get a little better idea of your own personal risk. Read more...