Is facial nerve paralysis painful?

Sometimes. Sometimes facial paralysis can have pain if it is caused by a virus. This can be called ramsey hunt syndrome. Also, many bell's palsy patients describe "pins and needles" sensation for unclear reasons.
Typically not. Isolated facial nerve paralysis is not associated with pain, as opposed to trigeminal neuralgia which typically causes pain but no weakness. If you have both pain and weakness, the possibility of an inflammatory or mechanical process affecting both nerves needs to be considered. These can be dangerous, and should be evaluated as soon as possible.

Related Questions

Facial nerve paralysis. Is that bells?

Maybe. Bell's palsy is one cause of facial paralysis, but there are others. Anything involving paralysis needs to be addressed by a doctor, pronto. Read more...

My sister says she has facial nerve paralysis. Are family members more likely to get the same thing?

Not likely but... There are many etiologies of facial paralysis, some of which require treatment. Some of those could be genetic, but most are not. If she has not already, she needs to make sure she sees a doctor for evaluation. She may require some x-rays or other studies, and sometimes prompt medical intervention will help return her function to normal. Read more...
Unlikely. The most commun cause of facial nerve paralysis is bells palsy. It is a unilateral paralysis of the facial nerve of unknown origin and usually the patient recovers most function within 2 to 6 months. Sometime it can leave a permanent weakness in a part of the face or eyelid. It is not familial. Nevertheless one should get a full medical exam to rule out any serious or correctable problem. Read more...
Facial paralysis. This is not generally an inherited condition except for a few rare conditions and can even be present at birth. In adults it is most commonly the result of bells palsy, tumors, trauma/ or injury. Read more...
No. Although there are some syndromes associated with facial paralysis like melkersson-rosenthal syndrome, these don't run in families. It is not contagious. Read more...

How common or uncommon is facial nerve paralysis after a Cholesteatoma operation please?

Interesting. Already answered this myself a number of hours ago and saw 2 other responses from other colleagues as well...but I'll take another shot at it for BONUS POINTS! LOL. This is a rare but well known possible risk with this type of surgery. Intraoperative monitoring as well as careful surgical dissection avoids the complication. Stated statistic is about 1/500 cases result in facial nerve problem. Read more...

Are there good alternative therapies for facial nerve paralysis?

Many but no good! Treatment of facial nerve paralysis usually depends on what caused it. Trauma may be treated with repair or using Botox for symmetry. I am in allopathic medicine, not alternative medicine so i cannot address those treatments. One I have heard of that will not harm is the use of b-vitamen complexes which are supportive for nerves. Too much can damage, so stick to recommended doses. Read more...
Depends on the cause. Early in bells palsy decompression can prevent perm paralysis but, since most go away on their own- hard to choose candidate. Cut nerve man be repaired by plastic surgeon, recovery usu<100% after age 30 and 1mm per day. No solution usu if stroke. Congenital can respond to high tech tissue(nerve muscle) by plastic surgeon. Ps- only real plastic surgeons do this. Start by looking for abps certificat. Read more...
No really. No dependable alternative therapies exist. The cause of the paralysis is very important. A bell's palsy should probably be seen and treated by an ENT to ensure appropriate treatment (high dose steroids +/- decompression surgery). If the paralysis is complete, surgical options exists for the various problems associated with the paralysis. See a facial plastic surgeon w/ experience in this area. Read more...