Is rotator cuff syndrome curable?

Absolutely. Is all about the getting proper history, examining, treating, reexamining. Treatment could includes oral medications, injections. Evaluation include history, exam, xray, mri, referral to physical therapy, ortho, pain management. Be aware rotator cuff is a general term (we have many terms depending on findings). Remember it could take 6 months to fully recover (many time it takes less).
Potentially. Depends on the chronicity, type and severity of the problem. A good sports medicine physician, orthopedist is key. If it's not responding to physical therapy, obtain an MRI or high-res ultrasound to rule out tear, tendinosis (crappy quality) as well as other common shoulder problems that cause pain. Treatment options sometimes include pt, corticosteroid injections, platelet rich plasma, surgery.

Related Questions

How come I have rotator cuff syndrome, but nobody else in the family has it?

No genetic linkage. There is no strong family linkage with rotator cuff tendinitis. If you experience symptoms depends on the interplay of how your shoulder is built/functions and the how you use your shoulder. While clearly you are built in a fashion that is similar to other family members, it is not out of the ordinary that not everyone has shoulder problems (yet). Read more...
Not inherited. Rotator cuff syndrome develops from the way you use the 4 muscles that stabilize the humerus (long arm bone above the elbow). Although alignment of your clavicle (which may be inherited) can contribute, more common causes include muscle imbalance and poor shoulder mechanics. Many people have tight chest muscles, out of proportion to back muscle strength. A physical therapist can help correct this. Read more...
Bad Luck? Or even could be due to activity you do. Hard to say without more info. See a musculoskeletal specialist or orthopedic surgeon to discuss your options for care. Read more...
Not familial. It is not a familial problem, but usually related to injury or overuse. Read more...

What kind of doctor sees somebody for rotator cuff syndrome?

Orthopaedic surgeon. An orthopaedic surgeon specializes in conditions affecting the musculoskeletal system. Rotator cuff syndrome is a very common condition, ranging from mild inflammation to severe tearing and arthritis. Treatments may consist of oral medications, injections, therapy and surgery for more severe disease. Make sure your surgeon is board certified. Check out aaos.Org for more information. Read more...

How can I treat rotator cuff syndrome?

Depends! It can be primarly the results of rotator cuff tendinitis secondary to overuse. It can occur in inflammatory seronegative spondyloarthritis. It can also result from impingement syndrome, which pinches the supraspinatus tendon and mechically irritates it. I inject first. If pain improves for weeks or months or longer, great. If only a day or two of benfit, x-rays and an orthopedic visit next. Read more...
First non op. The treatment is first non operative. This consists of anti inflammatories, pt, and an injection. A concerted effort at this may be a very effective method of improving symptoms. If not, surgical intervention is indicated. The surgery itself is outpatient and fairly low risk, however the recovery requires 4-6 months. Read more...
Physical therapy. First,, see a sports medicine specialist, for an accurate diagnosis. That MD will most likely prescribe medication and physical therapy. Read more...

Does rotator cuff syndrome usually cause many symptoms?

Usually. This is due to a sprain or tear in the tendenous support of the shoulder. In the most common form, the pain varies but you will have trouble raising your hand above chest level, the position to go behind your back to scratch will hurt badly and twisting motions like opening a jar will be very painful. Nsaids can help but if persistent over several weeks, see your orthopod. Read more...

What are the most common symptoms of rotator cuff syndrome?

Shoulder Pain. Shoulder weakness and pain especially when reaching overhead or behind your back or sleeping on that side. Here's a good link to more informaiton: http://www.Mayoclinic.Com/health/rotator-cuff-injury/ds00192. Read more...
Pain. Pain, often times at night, difficulty elevating your arm, and pain running down the outside of your upper arm, are the common symptoms. Read more...

Do lots of people get rotator cuff syndrome, or is it unusual?

Not that common. Rotator cuff tear , really cause inability to move the arm up, not just pain--more common inflamation of the tendons called tendinitis--get an exam. Read more...
Hm. Complicated. I'm not sure there is a specific "syndrome" but plenty of ppl, especially the eldery and younger active overhand throwing athletes, show damage to the rotator cuff. A portion of these people will be symptomatic from the damage. Acute ruptures in young people may be repaired surgically. In the elderly they may be treated with phys therapy only. Read more...
Impingement syndrome. In my practice, which is limited to disorders of the shoulder and elbow, problems related to the rotator cuff are the most common complaints i see. Read more...
Not unusual. Rotator cuff syndrome/strain/tendinitis is extremely common. Usually first treated with anti-inflammatory medications and physical therapy. Read more...

My wife thinks I should see someone for my rotator cuff syndrome. Should I get x-rayed first?

Rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is a group of muscles responsible for shoulder movements. Plain radiographs (x-rays) can't tell whether any of these muscles or their tendons are torn. Studies of choice are MRI or possibly shoulder arthroscopy. See your pcp or an orthopedic or sports medicine specialist for evaluation. (s)he will then order the appropriate test. Read more...
Maybe. The best people to evaluate this are sports medicine specialists and sports orthopedic surgeons. They may order no imaging, shoulder xray and/or MRI (with or without contrast). This decision is based upon their confidence in clinical exam, symptoms, and age. Older doctors tend to trust their exams more than mri. Xray can be useful to rule out other gross problems or show chronic cuff rupture. Read more...
YES preferably. To evaluate pain in a region its important you obtain xrays. An orthopedist can easily rule out specific shoulder findings on the xrays such as arthritis in the ac or shoulder joint, presence of spurs and or abnormal bony morphology, subtle fractures, unfused bony fragments etc...Yes xray first then if necessary additional imaging modalities such as mri, mra, ct, cta, bone scan can be ordered. Read more...
Yes. Xrays are always recommended to assess the bony structure of your shoulder, and to see if there's any radiographic evidence of what might be responsible for your shoulder pain. Read more...

My sister says she has rotator cuff syndrome. Are family members more likely to get the same thing?

Not genetic. Rotator cuff syndrome is typically an inflammation in one of the tendons of the rotator cuff. It is often related to overuse with motion such as serving a tennis ball or throwing a baseball. Often it can be treated with rest, ice and nsaids. Strengthening of the rotator cuff muscles can also be done to help prevent re- currence in symptoms. Read more...
No. There is no definable family connection with rotator cuff syndrome. This shoulder problem is a result of many different factors, including the individual way that you are built and the way that you use your shoulder. I assume that there are similarities between the shoulders of sisters but it is not the extent that you have a greater risk than the anyone else. Although it is a common problem. Read more...
Yes likely. Although the exact genetic component has not been determined, people with relatives who have experienced rotator cuff tears are at increased risk of similar tendon tears themselves, according to a study published in the may 2009 issue of the journal of bone and joint surgery (jbjs). “this strongly suggests genetic predisposition as a possible cause for rotator cuff disease”. Read more...

Can MRI help to diagnose rotator cuff syndrome?

Yes. Mri is an excellent exam to evaluate the rotator cuff. In addition, other structures including the labrum, tendons, muscles, bones, and soft tissues are well seen. Read more...
Yes, along with exam. Mri is an excellent imaging choice to further define shoulder problems. Usually, MRI is most valuable after a medical consultation and physical examination by a shoulder specialist. That physician can then best correlate MRI findings with clinical findings and determine the best course of action. Read more...