Can getting a cavity filling hurt?

Not if you are numb. If your tooth is numbed up with a local anesthetic, there is nothing to feel. Some small fillings do not require local anesthesia. Everyone has different pain thresholds. Often, "sweet air" alone is sufficient to negate the need for local anesthesia. Discuss this issue with your own dentist.

Related Questions

Can getting a first cavity filling hurt with no novicane?

Depends. I have been able to catch early decay and use laughing gas without anesthetic to fill a tooth. I normally numb so work with your dentist and do what is best to do the procedure correctly. Read more...

Was wondering if you have a cavity and have to get fillings does it hurt?

Dull sensation. With local anesthetics, dental treatment pain is the stuff of mythology and hysteria--if and only if you don't wait until dental disease is a full blown infection. In some advanced, abscess cases, anesthetic doesn't work 100%. In those cases, i'll prescribe antibiotics and home care remedies until infection subsides and then provide therapy. Much more confortable for both of us! Read more...

Do you think it could be wise to get cosmetic dentistry before getting a cavity filling?

Cavity filled. There is a sequence to go through for treatment. Generally decay (cavities) are taken care of first, along with gum disease. Many times the cometic dentistry takes care of the decay in a tooth. A separate procedure is not needed. Read more...
Absolutely not. First eliminate infections in teeth (cavities) and gums. Then if necessary, have teeth straightened to reduce extent and cost of cosmetic work. Finally have the least amount of drilling and filling that you can. Remember, "permanent" restorations do not last forever. Ask your dentist to help you sequence treatment for the best most long-lasting result. And then go for regular check-ups. Read more...
No way. You cannot establish a beautiful cosmetic result upon a faulty or defective foundation. Most good family general dentists are excellent at what is called cosmetic dentistry and always eliminate decay and disease before embarking on esthetic finishing touches. Read more...
No. Get the decay, periodontal disease, or any active infection taken care of before cosmetic procedures are done. Read more...
Decay first. It's best to get decay arrested, but their are options of doing decay removal at same time cosmetic dentistry is being done. Read more...
Cosmetic dentist. Most cosmetic dentists are general dentists and do all forms of dentistry. But you should take care of you general dental needs before doing cosmetic dentistry. Read more...
Depends on how big.. The tooth decay is. If it is quite tiny it is not as big a deal. Ideally we prefer to have the mouth decay and disease free prior to any cosmetic dentistry. Read more...
Depends . If the cavity is within or just through enamel, then depending on your rate of decay, a few months may not be too serious. If it is further along, then you run the risk of it getting deep enough to cause pain, or needing a root canal... I usually make sure the mouth is free of cavities and gum disease before proceeding with cosmetic dentistry. Exception: whitening prior to a filling... Read more...
In combination? If the cosmetic dentistry can be done in conjunction with decay removal, that would be the ideal situation. If it is an emergency event where you need the cosmetic work done first, then maybe. Read more...
No. You need to make sure all cavities taken care first you can always see if both can done simultaneously. Read more...
No. It makes more sense to me to take care of pathology first. You do want a healthy mouth before considering cosmetic dentistry. Read more...
Speak with DDS. What type of cosmetic dentistry are you referring to? A natural colored restoration is deemed cosmetic. Speak to your dentist prior to beginning treatment and have a succinct plan of action. Obviously, treat all areas of decay first, but they can be treated conservatively and aesthetically as well. Read more...
Restorations First. Restore any decayed teeth first to determine the extent of the problem, then consider any cosmetic dentistry. Read more...
Filling First. If you've lost a filling, you now have a hole in your tooth. That hole will definitely get bigger and bigger, leading to more expensive dentistry and quite possibly a toothache. Maybe, you'll even lose that tooth. Cosmetic dentistry can wait until your tooth is fixed...your smile isn't getting worse every day, but that hole in your tooth is. So, get a new filling, then have a cosmetic dental exam. Read more...

How much will a cavity filling hurt?

Not at all. With local anesthetics, dental treatment pain is the stuff of mythology and hysteria--if and only if you don't wait until dental disease is a full blown infection. In some advanced, abscess cases, anesthetic doesn't work 100%. In those cases, i'll prescribe antibiotics and home care remedies until infection subsides and then provide therapy. Much more confortable for both of us! Read more...

Can a cavity filling hurt afterwards?

Sometimes. This should be mild and temporary. If not, check back with your own dentist. Read more...
It should not. Properly done, with appropriate analgesia [pain control] and proper technique, they should not. Read more...

Please help! Does getting a filling in a cavity hurt?

Anesthesia. Based on the depth of decay, a local anesthetic will numb the area during placement and results are generally satisfactory depending on closeness to the nerve. Read more...

What are possible reasons that my cavity hurts after filling it a year ago?

IDK. You need to see your dentist to find out what is wrong. This is absolutely is not normal. It might be any number of things- the same tooth or perhaps an adjacent one. Your dentist can determine the cause and suggest treatment. If he\she can't, consult with another dentist. Read more...
An infected nerve. Many times a properly done filling that seals the tooth completely properly actually seals in a dead or dying nerve. After a period of time this dying nerve which is inflamed and tries to expand goes in the path of least resistance which is down the root to the jaw. This pain seems like a "cavity hurting after a year". Usually it is indicative of the need for root canal therapy. Read more...