Should I go to physical therapy for shin splints causing numbness, tingling and cramping in feet?

Several Options... "shin splint" typically refers to pain on the front of the lower leg, . Pain in this area may come from medial tibial stress syndrome (mtss), stress fractures, or compartment syndrome. Identifying the underlying reason for your pain can then help with a specific plan of care. Treatments usually consist of rest, stretching, ice, massage, or orthotics. (drmarkgalland.Com).

Related Questions

Can you run through shin splints? I have taken 3 weeks off from running, went to physical therapy, tried ice, heat, compression and new shoes.

Not typically. The term shin splint usually denotes an injury to anterior tibialis muscle origin on the tibia. That is the muscle that dorsiflexes the foot and simply "running through" it will likely result in a worsening of your condition (if it has been accurately diagnosed). Read more...
Imaging indicated. Shin Splints can encompass several similar entities: stress injury or stress fracture of the tibia (large prominent leg bone); medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS); exertional compartment syndrome. Xrays may be indicated if now chronic or recurrent symptoms are present. MRI is often helpful when trying to ascertain extent and exact degree of bony (if any) involvement. Further evaluation warranted. Read more...
Yes. Shin splints are usually attributed to tears in the periosteum (the covering of the bone) in the shins. As long as you can tolerate the pain, you can run through it. That being said, there are some serious conditions (such as stress fracture) which can cause similar symptoms. See your doctor to get cleared for physical activity. Hope this helps! Read more...
Depends. You should have a complete work up by your Doctor or a specialist, and tests maybe an MRI. If there is no evidence of a stress syndrome or fracture of the bone, then diminish your running, and use your treatments that you listed. Diminish your activity, but do not stop, to a level where the symptoms are resolving for 3-4 weeks. When pain free, start to slowly increase your running. Read more...