How come I have temporal arteritis, but nobody else in the family has it?

Not infection. Temporal arteritis is not infection or genetic, it is autoimmune treated with steroids, can have other body symptoms than headache in polymyalgia---can threaten vision--see your doctor.

Related Questions

Does temporal arteritis just affect in their 50's or can I afect young men too?

It certainly could. Disease does not follow the usual pattern in the majority of cases. Classical circumstances are found in textbooks not clinics. Read more...
Rarely. It is possible, but extremely rare. One neurologist i used to work with said that unless there is overwhelming evidence, being under 50 virtually excludes it. Read more...

What is temporal arteritis?

Risk of blindness. It is form of auto-immune disease causing inflammation of blood vessels, not just teporal artery. Patients are at high risk of blindness due to involvement of blood vessels in the eye. The disease can be controlled with stroids (prednisolone). It is also called giant cell arteritis, usually occurs in older people, may be associated with fever and constitutional symptoms. Read more...
Inflammation. Temporal arteritis (ta) is a non-infectious inflammation of the temporal arteries, ususally seen in individuals over 50 yrs. Headache or head pains are the most common complaint, associated with tender temporal arteries. Other symptoms include jaw claudication, anorexia, fever, anemia and elevated wbc. An elevated sedimentation rate(esr) is typically above 80mm/hr, but ta can occur with normal esr. Read more...

What is temporal arteritis?

Temporal afteritis. Is a vasculitis -- that is inflammation of a blood vessel. It is an autoimmune disease -- the immune system attacking ones own body. The temporal part refers to the dominant vessel involved -- on the temple (in front of and just above the ear. Read more...
Artery inflammation. Also known as "giant cell arteritis" is an auto-immune disease characterized by inflammation of the vessels of the head and neck. Its cause is unknown. It is more common in women and usually is seen in the elderly. Definitive diagnosis requires removal of a portion of the superficial temporal artery and examination under a microscope looking for "giant cells" that are damaging the arteries. Read more...

How can I treat temporal arteritis?

Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids like Prednisone and Prednisolone whic are strong medications that block inflammation which is important in temporal arteritis because there is a risk of blindness in untreated patients. The blindness occurs because there are inflammed blood vessels called arteries - hense the term arteritis - can block the flow of blood flow interferring with eye function. These need monitoring. Read more...
Steroids . If you were diagnosed with or even highly suspected of having temporal arteritis, you need to be on steroids urgently. A temporal artery biopsy can confirm the diagnosis, but steroids should be started first. Steroids can been tapered slowly over time according to your doctors recommendation. Read more...

What can I do for temporal arteritis?

Steroids. Steroids, most commonly, prednisone, are the only generally accepted treatment for the symptoms of ta. Other medications have been used with varying and mostly disappointing results. Read more...
Options beyond pred! Steroids may be used initially, but the use of Methotrexate , and more recently the tnf-alpha inhibitors have shown remarkable efficacy with quick action. The high dose steroids used solely in the past may have saved lives. But still cause major problems for patients. Read more...

What are the signs of temporal arteritis?

Head pain. Localized pain over the temple and swollen temporal artery can presage blindness, and even a stroke, and clues can be found with blood tests. The diagnosis may require a temporal artery biopsy. Treatment with steroids can control the process. Read more...
Temporal arteritis. Excessive sweating, fever, general ill feeling jaw pain that comes and goes or occurs when chewing loss of appetite, muscle aches pain and stiffness in the neck, upper arms, shoulder, and hips throbbing headache on one side of the head or the back of the head scalp sensitivity, tenderness when touching the scalp vision difficulties blurred vision double vision reduced vision weakness, tiredness. Read more...

Do a lot of people get temporal arteritis?

No. There are certain populations that are at risk including those of scandinavian ancestry, but it can be found in all populations including blacks, asians, etc there is not a clear picture to predict who gets it but these are generalizations. Read more...

What are the symptoms of temporal arteritis?

Symptoms of TA. Headache, the most common symptom, usually begins early in the course of the disease and is present in at least two-thirds of patients. Initially the headache may be the only presenting symptom with the temporal and occipital regions being the most common locations. Tender spots or nodules may be present in the scalp, especially over inflamed arteries. Read more...