What kind of doctor sees somebody for small bowel obstruction?

General Surgeon. The management of a small bowel obstruction can be challenging and requires a surgeon so as to "follow" one's course and decide if surgery is necessary. On the one hand, most obstructions are due to scar tissue from prior surgery and will often get better without surgery; on the other hand, the intestine can die and lead to life-threatening problems. Therefore, we have to watch one very closely.
Surgeon. Your pcp can make the diagnosis with an exam and xrays or ct scan of abdomen, but treatment is best overseen by a surgeon in case it doesn't resolve with medical therapy and surgery is required.

Related Questions

The doctor did a ct scan and said looks like a small bowel obstruction but I have severe diarrhea could it be something else and how's it treated?

Not likely. A ct scan is not the best test for a functional bowel obstruction. A small bowel series is a better option. The cynics a one time picture and the fact that you are having diarrhea probably rules out the chance of a vowel obstruction. I think there is something else going in. Stool cultures are in order and possibly more testing. . Read more...

Is small bowel obstruction painful?

Small bowl pain. Yes, it can be. Afterall, it's an obstruction! Read more...
Yes. Anytime an organ distends, it can cause pain. Also if the obstruction causes a lack of blood supply to an area of the bowel (ischemia) that will cause pain. Read more...

What should I not eat so I can avoid small bowel obstruction from scar tissue?

No connection. Small bowel obstruction from scar tissue (or adhesions) is caused by scarring that is external to the small intestine, usually caused by previous abdominal surgery or infection. I am not aware that any special diet will increase or decrease the risk of this happening. Read more...

What is the difference between a large bowel obstruction and a small bowel obstruction?

Different casues. Unfortunately large bowel obstruction, particularly in adults, is almost always due to malignancy. Small bowel obstruction on the other hand more commonly occurs from benign conditions, especially in patients who have had prior abdominal surgery. Both conditions would require an imaging test and likely surgery to repair. Read more...
Different causes. Small bowel obstruction is rarely due to a lesion or intussuception. It is mostly due to adhesions from previous surgery. Large bowel does not obstruct from adhesions but usually an intraluminal lesion such as carcinoma of colon. Read more...

I need help with small bowel obstruction?

Small bowel obstruct. Ion is a medical emergency. It should be treated by confirming the diagnosis, bowel rest, possible decompression with a nasogastric tube on suction. If not resolving within 24 hours, surgical exploration is indicated to avoided ischemic or dead bowel. Do not delay if you think you are obstructed. This is not to be treated t home! Read more...

What can I do for small bowel obstruction?

Come to hospital. A small bowel obstruction usually occurs due to scar tissue from prior abdominal surgery, causing the bowel to kink like a garden hose. If severe, the bowel can die; however, the bowel can (and usually does) unkink itself after a day-or-two of "bowel rest": no food or liquid, IV fluids, and keeping the stomach empty with a ng tube. This requires close monitoring in the hospital. Read more...
Depends on the. Cause of sbo. If you had previous surgery, you will have adhesions, and intestines can get caught inside or twist around these. But there are other causes, such as intestinal tumors, that can cause sbo, so you need to see a gastroenterologist or a surgeon who can help you sort things out. Read more...

Are the symptoms of small bowel obstruction bad?

YES. Small bowel obstruction can be dangerous and deadly if not treated appropriately. The common symptoms are abdominal pain, abdominal swelling, nausea, and vomiting. Read more...
It can be. The most common symptoms include cramping, generalized abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, bloating, and the absence of any passage of stool or gas. We call this last symptom obstipation, and it is a very important predictor of the severity of the episode. In some cases, the pain becomes constant and severe--this may represent a compromised blood supply to the bowel, requiring emergency surgery. Read more...